(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Pilgrim"



r : -s »$;,TE„. 




By Faith and Fortitude 



3m. i^lb 



THE PILGRIM 

Volume XX Plymouth, Mass., June, 1941 No. 1 

Published by the Plymouth Senior High School 

1940 DL Pilgrim Staff 1941 

Editor-in-chief ...- Walter Corrow 

Asst. Editor-in-chief ------- -------- George Canucci 

Literary Editor ---------------- Dorothy Morton 

Junior Literary Editor ------------- Jeanette Franks 

Sophomore Literary Editor ------------ Richard Kearsley 

Business Manager -------------- Joseph Lamborghini 

„ . \ Edwin Bastoni 

Asst. Business Managers ____...- j ^^ WHmNG 

Sales Promotion ---------------- Anne Donovan 

Boys' Athletics ----------------- Peter Brigida 

Girls' Athletics ----------------- Joan Gardner 

Art Editor ------------------- Mary Creati 

Asst. Art Editor ---------------- Lydia Mongan 

Sophomore Art Editor ------------- - Naomi McNeil 

Exchange Editor ---------------- Marcia Brooks 

French Editor ---------------- Martha Vickery 

Asst. French Editor --------------- Anna Scotti 

Latin Editor ------------------ George Doten 

Asst. Latin Editor ---------------- Anne Richards 

Alumni Editor ----------------- Barbara Viets 

Asst. Alumni Editor ------------- Benjamin Brewster 

Joke Editor ----------------- Stanley Roberts 

Asst. Joke Editor --------------- David Hamilton 

Clubs -------------------- Betty Whiting 

Asst. Clubs ------------------ Mercy Kellen 

\ Laura Paoletti 
Senior Features -------------- j p AgQUALINA Farina 

Junior Features --------------- Richard Gavone 

Sophomore Features -------------- Loring Belcher 

„ /Frances Johnson 

Senior Poems ----- I Marian Radcliffe 

Candid Camera ---------------- Frances Dretler 

Asst. Candid Camera ------------ Bernard Kritzmacher 

Typist -------------------- Helen Correa 




THIS BOOK IS DEDICATED TO 

Mr. Anson B. Handy 





IN GRATEFUL ACKNOWL- 
EDGMENT OF FIFTEEN YEARS 
OF SERVICE TO THE SCHOOLS 
AND TO THE CHILDREN OF 
PLYMOUTH, AND IN RECOGNI- 
TION OF HIS APPOINTMENT TO 
THE PRESIDENCY OF HYANNIS 
STATE TEACHERS' COLLEGE. 



#/§&* 





£***}*> ..i. 



SENIORS 



Joseph Lamborghini . . . senior class president ... is five 
feet eleven inches tall . . . has light hair, blue eyes .... born in 

Plymouth, Massachusetts, on May 14, 1924 has one real 

mania . . . delivering sales talks for Ford automobiles to the ex- 
clusion of all other makes, even Cadillacs ... is "that way" over 
a certain officer of the Senior Class, said affliction becoming 
strangely apparent in Senior year .... conducts class meetings 
with great ease, after indicating, with not too' much subtlety, his 
own opinion on the subject under discussion . . . likes chocolate 
ice cream, brunettes, and axle grease . . . official "stamper-upper" 
at P. H. S. basketball games .... also used typical Ford "zip" 
in getting advertisements for the "Pilgrim" .... expert "par ex- 
cellence" at putting chains on skidding ticket sales promotions . . 
charged batteries occasionally for S. A. S. . . . furnished fuel, 
spark, and lubrication for success of Junior Promenade . . . am- 
bition — to become an executive of the River Rouge Plant. 





Frederick Wirzburger . . vice-president of the class of '41 . . 
possesses curly brown hair and brown eyes . . . five feet seven 
inches tall .... born in Plymouth on October 2, 1923 . . . active 
member of S. A. S. . . . hobby — photography ... a member of the 
inimitable "German Band" .... enjoys playing his souzaphone, 
committee work, and long walks to and from school . . . gives 
promise of being an excellent agriculturist . . . his greatest dislike 
— an annoying Wendell Wilkie curl . . . has good sense of humor 
as shown by his excellent collection of jokes ... is the student 
manager of the ten-cent-a-week plan. 



Mary Creati . . . popular secretary of our class .... five feet 
two inches tall with laughing brown eyes . . . friendly, attractive, 
busy in various ways . . . always finds time to chat about any- 
thing but automobiles . . . says she knows which is best . . . hobby 
— art . . . avocation — being talent scout for quaint, queer, and 
quixotic personalities. ... is very efficient art editor for "Pil- 
grim" . . . served as secretary of our class for four consecutive 
years ... is member of S. A. S. . . . likes water colors, asking ques- 
tions, and "les blonds" .... finds Woman's Club work interesting 
. . . ambition — to become a commercial artist . . . born in Plym- 
outh on July 9, 1923. 





George Shea . . . efficient treasurer ... he of the auburn hair 
and brown eyes . . . five feet ten inches to his credit ... is secre- 
tary of S. A. S. and a banker of two years' experience . . . likes 
baseball, movie shows, and dance bands . . . very busy in the cor- 
ridors during recess . . . most helpful usher . . . prefers colorful 
neckwear . . .pet peeve — jitterbugging to "In The Mood" ... is a 
popular man with the ladies . . . born in Plymouth, Massachusetts, 
on September 23, 1923. 



Page 5 



Jrvie ^onp 



eddions 



SENIOR 

Alyce Agostinho 
Doris Anti 
Dorothy Bagni 
Pauline Barengo 
Caroline Barufaldi 
Harriet Bassett 
Doris Bernardoni 
Ruth Boutin 
Evelyn Boyle 
Rosa Bradley 
Margaret Brenner 

Evon Briggs 
Lorna Bugely 
Barbara Burt 
Benvinda Carvalho 
Florence Cornish 
Helen Correa 
Mary Creati 
Pamela Damment 
Thelma Dassman 
Teresa DeTrani 
Anne Donovan 
Patrice Dowd 
Frances Dretler 
Pasqualina Farina 
Agnes Fernandes 
Pauline Freyermuth 
Eleanor Gardner 
Joan Gardner 
Pauline Gilbert 
Argea Guidetti 
Marylew Haire 
Elenore Hall 
Virginia Hokinson 
Betty Howland 
Mary Iandoli 
Anna Jesse 
Frances Johnson 
Eleanor Joy 
Sylvia Keevey 
Mercy Kellen 

Frances Kierstead 
Harriette Klasky 
Barbara Knight 
Martha Lemius 
Mildred Lopresti 
Mary Marvelli 
Dorothy Morton 
Patricia O'Connell 
Betty Padlusky 
Laura Paoletti 
Alba Pasolini 
Deborah Perry 
Arlene Pirani 
Mary Quinlan 



HAPPIEST WHEN 
Arguing 

P. H. S. defeats Bridgewater 
In her musical moods 
Driving 

Performing a good deed 
She's out north 
She's not sad 
Eating 
On vacation 
Out of school 
Watching P. H. S. basketball 

games 
She has lots of money to spend 
It's 1:00 
Whitman calls 
Listening to swing music 
She's smiling 
Meeting new friends 
In a Ford car 
Dancing 

She has company 
She's dancing 
Eating 

Things are exciting 
She receives letters 
Singing a happy refrain 
Having an ice cream soda 
"High on a Windy Hill" 
Playing fullback 
Playing right halfback 
There's some excitement 
Vacation comes 
There's something to do 
He walks by 

Listening to Bob Eberle sing 
She behaves herself 
Reading 
Traveling 

She received her driving license 
Sleeping 

With a certain person 
Listening to Lansing Hatfield 

Bowling 

She gets "A" in bookkeeping 

At work 

In Kingston 

Singing 

She hears a certain something 

Playing the piano 

Day is done 

Reading 

All is well 

She's in Kingston 

Working in McClellan's 

Dancing a fast number 

In Boston 



PET ANNOYANCE 



Lending money 
Being called "Crisco" 
Writing poetry 
Bumpy roads 
History topics 
Missing the bus 
Candid camera fiends 
Alarm clock 
Report card 
Check tests 
Being called "Maggie" 

Getting up in the morning 

Conversation 

Blushing 

Biting fingernails 

Inquisitiveness 

Being "alone" 

Brown and Burgess 

Pipe smokers 

Brotherly love 

Being nagged 

White socks with black shoes 

Knuckle cracking 

Noise 

School girl actresses 

Oral topics 

Frogs 

Five and Ten Cent Stores 

Wearing rubbers 

Blushing 

Homelessons 

Confusion 

Snakes 

Oral topics 

Being called "Liz" 

Being teased 

Being kept waiting 

Being short 

Report card 

Dirty lockers 

Not being able to hear Lansing 

Hatfield 
Jitterbugs 
History 

Being called in the morning 
"Time" magazine 
Wearing stockings 
Bookkeeping class 
Homelessons 
Concentrating 
Notes 
Show-offs 
Onions 
Spitballs 

Boys who can't dance 
Oral topics 



Page 6 



SENIOR 



HAPPIEST WHEN 



PET ANNOYANCE 



Marian Radcliffe 
Dorothy Raymond 
Edna Raymond 
Nancy Reagan 
Claire Reed 
Naomi Richman 
Blanche Roby 
Ardele Rogers 
Frances Rossetti 
Patricia Sampson 
Elizabeth Sanderson 
Alice Sears 
Barbara Shaw 
Florence Shaw 
Marie Shimmelbush 
Edith Skulsky 
Bernice Smith 
Esther Smith 
Mary Smith 
Dorothy Souza 
Augusta Stefani 
Barbara Sullivan 
Laura Sylvia 
Eleanor Tassinari 
Alice Tavernelli 
Rose Valenziano 
Leona Vannah 
Martha Vickery 
Barbara Viets 

Shirley Weeden 
Kathleen White 
Jean White 
Betty Whiting 
Helen Whiting 
Barbara Wood 
Hazel Wrightington 
Olive Wrightington 
Arthur Amaral 
Stanley Barnes 
Idore Benati 
Adelino Bernardo 
Raymond Bibeau 
Peter Brigida 
Vito Brigida 
Errington Brown 
Allan Burgess 
Charles Butterfield 
George Carter 
Wilbert Cingolani 
Clarence Cleveland 
Henry Walter Corrow 
Tony Costa 
Arthur Cotti 
Minot Devitt 
Richard DiStefano 
George Doten 
Robert Drew 
Charles Dunham 
Arthur Dupuis 
James Ferreira 



Roaming the corridors 

Riding in a convertible coupe 

Eating 

Basketball season approaches 

Getting all "A's" 

The sun shines 

Making a new acquaintance 

Doing nothing 

Vacation comes 

Listening to Frank Sinatra 

She has her homelessons done 

The baker comes 

Dreaming 

Riding in an Indiana coupe 

Dancing 

Getting a new outfit 

Sleeping 

She has money 

No homelessons to do 

In Bristol, R. I. 

On a horse 

Buying new clothes 

Watching a Ford go by 

In Amesbury 

Not alone 

Dancing 

She's sleeping 

Writing letters 

People call her Barby, not Betty 

Buying clothes 

Riding in a Ford V-8 

Sleeping 

Flowers bloom in spring 

Playing goalee 

Having her own way 

Dancing 

Buying clothes 

Riding around town 

You guess! 

Laughing 

Sports 

Dancing 

On a basketball court 

Sleeping 

Graduation comes 

Driving a Ford 

Out sailing 

At a football game 

She walks by 

Listening 

Singing in close harmony 

Playing the cornet 

Playing baseball 

Out hunting 

Playing with a good band 

Sleeping 

In Wellesley Hills 

Sleeping 

Quitting time 

In New York 



French book reports 

History 

Being teased 

Being called "Shanks" 

Oral topics 

When it starts to rain unexpectedly 

Driving slowly 

Work 

Squealers 

Being called "Red" 

Tests 

The telephone 

Youngsters 

Her height 

Being teased 

Impudent children 

Blushing 

Sarcasm 

Surprise tests 

Her height 

Owls 

Freckles 

Too much competition 

Snobs 

Getting up in the morning 

Blushing 

Wisecracks 

Her fiddle 

To have people speak about her 

accident 
Thunderstorms 
Homework 
Getting up early 
Stenography 
Goals! 
Drafts 
Red haii- 
English 

Running out of gas 
Blushing at the wrong time 
Frowning 
Quick temper 
Going to bed 

Rustlers invading his locker 
School 

Carrying the trays 
A "Willys" 
Most girls 
Clarence's overcoat 
Getting up early 
Algebra 
8 o'clock bell 
Girls 

Flashy neckties 
Writing poetry 
Brass men in band 
French oral topics 
Girls 
Hollis 
Brunettes 
A red head 

Page 7 



SENIOR 



HAPPIEST WHEN 



PET ANNOYANCE 



Harold Gallerani 
Edmund Gianferrari 
Joseph Giovanetti 
Louis Giovanetti 
John Hammer 
Boyd Hayward 
Joseph Lamborghini 
Weldon LaVoie 
Bernard Lexner 
Theodore Lodi 
Norman Longhi 
Wallace MacLean 
Alfred Martin 
Martin McAuley 
Christian Miranda 
Alvin Montanari 
Warren Neal 
Wesley Nickerson 
Donald Parsons 
William Po 
Edward Ribeiro 
Lee Roane 
Stanley Roberts 
Louis Scalabroni 
Curtis Shaw 
John Shaw 
George Shea 
Francis Stas 
Dean Stevens 
Harold Strassel 
Donald Studley 
Richard Toupin 
Edward Travers 
William Vickery 
Frederick Wirzburger 
Richard Wood 



When left alone 

Boston Bruins win 

Driving 

Swinging a hot one 

Bowling 

Gunning 

Selling a Ford 

In cooking class 

When dozing 

Cooking with Shaw 

There's a good band on the radio 

He's eaten a good dinner 

Among friends 

On the gridiron 

Being a sheik 

Taking pictures 

On a weenie roast 

Driving 

Spring comes 

Playing baseball 

Playing football 

Seeing a good movie 

It's 1:00 p. m. 

Riding in a plane 

Eating 

Hunting 

Down at 0. C. T. 

Playing the trombone 

Camping at Fresh Pond 

Sports 

Getting a raise 

Riding in a Ford coupe 

With the "boys" 

Playing baseball or fishing 

Doing something 

Driving 



Christmas neckties 

History notebooks 

Back-seat drivers 

Geometry 

No money 

Missing aim 

Walter and Oldsmobiles 

"Pinky's" corny sayings 

Setting up pins 

When the Dodge boils over 

90% of the girls 

All dressed up and no place to go 

Sneaks 

Freshman girls 

Easy work 

Poor pictures 

Hard work 

Stenography 

Relatives 

Mr. Packard's vocabulary 

Snobs 

Below 80° 

Woman drivers 

Doing nothing 

Homelessons 

Testing cars 

Strikes 

A sour note 

Hitting telephone poles 

His brother 

Participial phrases 

Getting up early 

When it's quiet 

White shoes 

Too many girls 

"Hamlet" 



IN TRIBUTE 

TN each senior high school in the state 
the National Society of the Daughters 
of the American Revolution requests 
the graduating class and the faculty to 
name the Best Girl Citizen in the Class 
of 1941. The candidate must possess the 
following four qualities of character to 
an outstanding degree — dependability, 
service, leadership, and patriotism. 

This honor has been awarded to 
Dorothy Morton, who, ever since she 
entered Plymouth High School, has 
shown her classmates and teachers that 
she is worthy of the title. 

In her sophomore year she was pres- 
ident of her home room, served on com- 
mittees for the Double L Dance and 
Sophomore Dance, and participated in 
the P. H. S. — Capades. While a junior, 
Dorothy was a member of the refresh- 

Page 8 



ment committee and an usher for the 
Junior Promenade, later serving as an 
usher at the Graduation Exercises and 
Senior Reception. This year, as a senior, 
she has taken active part in the sale of 
tuberculosis seals, worked on the com- 
mittee for the Senior Dance, been a 
Council Representative in the Student 
Activities Society, and pianist for the 
operetta "Martha" sponsored by the 
Society. During her three years in high 
school she has also played the piano at 
assemblies, been literary editor for the 
school annual, and participated in bas- 
ketball, badminton, hockey, and bowl- 
ing. 

Always dependable, always a good 
leader, she was our natural choice for 
this honor. The entire school supports 
the selection of Dorothy Morton as the 
best girl citizen of the Class of 1941. 
Ruth Boutin '41 



No record here of things they^ve done; 
We only seek to have some fun. 



ALYCE AGOSTINHO 

Though Alyice is a jolly girl, 
Her temper is quick to flare, 
Please be careful what you 

say — 
Or you'll wish that you weren't 

there. 



ARTHUR AMARAL 

Want a poem recited? 
Someone to sing or cheer? 
For any of these duties 
Arthur will volunteer. 



DORIS ANTI 

She thought she was more 
than pleasingly plump, 

So she went upon a diet; 

Now that the result has been 
observed, 

There are others who would 
try it. 



DOROTHY BAGNI 

Her lightest word would be 

our law 
With a new technique, 
If she'd have her way with us, 
She must let her 'cello speak. 



PAULINE BARENGO 

Posters there, posters here! 
She made them throughout all 

the year; 
In fact, her fingers flew so fast 
They triumphed o'er her 
tongue at last. 



STANLEY BARNES 

Don't be disarmed 

By his gentle smile: 

He can do battle 

If he thinks it worth while. 




CAROLINE BARUFALDI 

Knowing she could not have 

wings, 
She considered many things — 
Then fastened on her roller 

skates 
To win hands down o'er her 

classmates. 



HARRIET BASSETT 

She's forever busy 
From eight o'clock to one, 
Ask from her a favor — 
And it's as good as done. 



IDORE BENATI 

If someone versatile you'd 

meet. 
In studies bright, in football 

fleet, 
Just send for "Mac", he's hard 

to beat. 



ADELINO BERNARDO 

First he pauses, then he shoots 
From the middle of the floor; 
He's made another basket 
To bolster up our score. 



DORIS BERNARDONI 

There'll be shadow and sun for 

everyone 
As the years roll by, 
But she'll meet whate'er may 

come 
With her head held high. 



RAYMOND BIBEAU 

In school you rarely hear him, 
He's the quietest of boys, 
But wait until he gets out- 
side — 
Then harken to the noise. 



Page 9 



RUTH BOUTIN 

She studies in the morning:, 
She studies throug-h the 

night — 
Even if she tried to miss, 
She'd answer questions right. 



EVELYN BOYLE 

Hazel eyes 
And auburn hair 
Conspire to make 
A lady fair. 



ROSA BRADLEY 

The price of time and patience 
She will gladly pay 
Because she can be satisfied 
With nothing less than A. 



MARGARET BRENNER 

On the charge that she can't 

sew. 
The modern girl's indicted: 
To show the falsity of this 
Margaret's herewith cited. 



EVON BRIGGS 

She may not be in Hollywood, 
But our Oscar she has won 
For the nicest disposition 
In the Class of '41. 



PETER BRIGIDA 

At the game in Randolph 
No one of us grieved 
When some fourteen points 
Our Peter achieved. 



Page 10 




4itM 



VITO BRIGIDA 

The best time in all the year? 
Winter is his season — ■ 
Not that he's so rugged, 
Basketball's the reason. 



ERRINGTON BROWN 

Brownie's full of mischief 
In and out of school. 
But "Lend a hand to others' 
Has always been his rule. 



LORNA BUGELY 

She has need of a strong right 

arm. 
Not that she would fight — 
It must support the pile of 

books 
That she carries home each 

night. 



ALLAN BURGESS 

Chemistry or physics 
He simply can't resist: 
Can it be we harbor 
An embryo scientist? 



BARBARA BURT 

She'll cool your fever, 
Soothe your brow — 
That is, she will 
When she's learned how. 



CHARLES BUTTERFIELD 

Judging Charles by what he 

says, 
And we're not sure we can, 
The fairer sex must mend its 

ways — 
Or he'll live a single man. 



GEORGE CARTER 

If you desire a fine oration 
Delivered with exuberation 
We have some inside informa- 
tion: 
George excels in declamation. 



BENVINDA CARVALHO 

"Benny" is industrious: 
When school is over, then 
She hustles off to go to work 
In the "Five and Ten." 



WILBERT CINGOLANI 

If ever you see Willie 

Looking very blue, 

It's safe to bet the New York 

Yanks 
Have lost a game or two. 



CLARENCE CLEVELAND 

Though Clarence towers above 
us all, 

He's not the one to spurn the 
call 

Of friend in trouble or de- 
spair — 

Whene'er we need him, Cleevy's 
there. 



FLORENCE CORNISH 

She came from Arizona 

To our stern and rock-bound 

coast: 
We hope that here she'll find 

whate'er 
In life she prizes most. 



HELEN CORREA 

If there are more patient girls, 
We haven't met them yet — 
As staff tvpist on The Pilgrim 
She has placed us in her debt. 




WALTER CORROW 

"Service brings its own re- 
ward," 

The copy books proclaim; 

And if there's one boy who 
should know, 

Corrow is his name. 



TONY COSTA 

He plays third trumpet 
In Morgardo's Band; 
When he does a solo, 
He gets a good hand. 



ARTHUR COTTI 

Breaches in friendship 
He can prevent 
By using his father's 
Famous cement. 



MARY CREATI 

A penalty that's often paid 
By clever girls like you 
Is that others tend to give 
You far too much to do. 



PAMELA DAMMENT 

Columbus found America 
In fourteen ninety-two; 
We're very glad he did this 
So that we could welcome you. 



THELMA DASSMAN 

We would pay tribute 
To earnest endeavor — 
She has worked faithfully, 
Faltering never. 



Page 11 



TERESA DE TRANI 

Teresa, we have found you 
An artist through and through; 
You've served us in so many 

ways 
We've only praise for you. 



MINOT DEVITT 

He keeps his own counsel, 
He goes his own way 
Doing what must be done 
Faithfully each day. 



RICHARD DiSTEFANO 

You play the piano 
With such little ado 
It's well there are studies 
To challenge you. 




*4ifc 



ANNE DONOVAN 

We've been led astray 

Bv ^hat people say: 

She has the red hair 

But bad temper's not there- 

Wc'vc been led astrav. 



GEORGE DOTEN 

We know that Latin IV you 

took, 
Your excellence we couldn't 

brook 
Until at last we solved the 

riddle — 
Your old friend, Nero, played 

the fiddle. 



PATRICE DOWD 

Yesterday we knew the knight 
Who wore her token on his 

shield — 
But now that a few hours have 

Dassed, 
He's vanquished from the field. 



Page 12 




FRANCES DRETLER 

We think it matters little 
Whether you're short or tall, 
When your stature is not 

great, 
Ycu don't have far to fall. 



ROBERT DREW 

His inter*est in the feminine 
Now extends to ships, 
It's possible that - f 'The Sha- 
dow" 
Will the rest eclipse. 



CHARLES DUNHAM 

Net on Burns and Allen, 
Net on Bergen's son — 
We depend on one of our own 
For the laughs in '41. 



ARTHUR DUPUIS 

You said it took real energy 
To keep up with '41 — 
We're glad you didn't leave us 
Before the race was run. 



PASQUALINA FARINA 

Quiet of manner, 
Quiet of speech — 
Ready to learn all 
The textbooks can teach. 



AGNES FERNANDES 

If she guarded her tongue 
Like her "man" in a game, 
We'd have it more quiet. 
We hereby proclaim. 



JAMES FE'RREIRA 

We've looked at him from time 
to time 

And prayed hard — for we 
feared 

We'd see him some fine morn- 
ing: 

Wearing; a full beard. 



PAULINE FREYERMUTH 

We wonder, what's in King- 
ston 

That each night draws her 
there, 

It couldn't be the ball game, 

So it must be a ballplayer. 



HAROLD GALLERANI 

"So tight he kept his lips com- 
pressed 

Scarce any words came 
through," 

Sorry, Harold, our mistake — 

These lines are not for you. 



ELEANOR GARDNER 

She can't understand girls 
Who're languid in gym, 
To her it's the one place 
To get excited in. 



JOAN GARDNER 

She can wield a stick 
Or toss a ball, 
Then write a column 
About it all. 



EDMUND GIANFERRARI 

That he has a nose for news 
No one of us can doubt; 
In Mrs. Raymond's News Tests 
He puts us all to rout. 




PAULINE GILBERT 

Last June at Commencement 

Pauline lost a friend, 

But the loss proved one of 

those 
The passing of time could 

mend. 



JOSEPH GIOVANETTI 

His whistle and chatter 
In Room 303 
Are wont to disturb 
Our serenity. 



LOUIS GIOVANETTI 

Louis plays his trumpet well, 
His orchestra leads with zeal — 
If you're in a dancing mood, 
His music will appeal. 



ARGEA GUIDETTI 

While some girls forego sun- 
daes 
For fear of gaining weight, 
This is at least one sacrifice 
She need not contemplate. 



MARYLEW HAIRE 

We harbor the suspicion 
That she's not always quiet, 
But we cannot picture her 
As leader in a riot. 



ELENORE HALL 

Tinkle! Tinkle! hear them fall 

Gently as the rain — 

In Mrs. Raymond's English 

class 
She picks up pearls again. 



Page IS 



JOHN HAMMER 

If you but hesitate, you're lost 
When Johnnie Hammer you 

accost, 
To beat him to the door we've 
tried — 
But John is speed personified. 



BOYD HAYWARD 

He seems to like our company; 
But when all is said and done, 
If he had to make a choice, 
We'd lose to dog and gun. 



VIRGINIA HOKINSON 

Obese we fear 
She'll never be — 
Though she eats 
Sweets constantly. 



BETTY HOWLAND 

Betty always bustles in 
At one minute before eight: 
She's hardly ever early. 
Still — almost never late. 



MARY IANDOLI 

We know what your ambition 

is, 
May you reach your goal; 
Another Nightingale you'd be, 
Revered from pole to pole. 



ANNA JESSE 

First the squeal, 
Then a wriggle; 
Knowing Anna, 
We wait for the giggle. 



Page 14 




FRANCES JOHNSON 

She battled shamelessly with 

us 
To get these poems done; 
But before you lies the proof 
That her tactics won. 



ELEANOR JOY 

This girl has 
A favorite song — - 
She warbles "Sylvia" 
All day long. 



SYLVIA KEEVEY 

From her no hysterical giggle, 
No piteous moan or groan — 
Such exhibitionism 
She will not condone. 



MERCY KELLEN 

If on Major Bowes' hour 
You should sing a song, 
With that lovely voice of yours 
You'd never get the gong. 



FRANCES KIERSTEAD 

In truth it can be said of her 

She works as hard as she 
plays — 

We're conscious of her pres- 
ence 

In numerous pleasant ways. 



HARRIETTE KLASKY 

No one could dress hurriedly 

And look so very right, 

She must plan what clothes 

she'll wear 
Before she rests at night. 



BARBARA KNIGHT 

Her heart's desire 
She should attain 
Because she tries, 
Then tries again. 



JOSEPH LAMBORGHINI 

You made for us a leader fine, 
As president you toed the 

line — 
But, if that job had not existed, 
As super salesman you'd be 
listed. 



WELDON La VOIE 

For choosing clothes and wear- 
ing them 
Weldon has a flair, 
He can tell you, if he will, 
What the well-dressed man 
should wear. 



MARTHA LEMIUS 

Salvos of laughter, 
An exchange of jokes — 
Beware of Martha's 
Vigorous pokes. 



BERNARD LEXNER 

We'd like to see you do it 
Just to prove it can be done; 
Approach the school with 

measured gait 
And not upon the run. 



THEODORE LODI 

He is no melancholy Dane — 
He quiet agrees with Brown- 
ing: 
At the problems of the day 
There is no sense in frowning. 




NORMAN LONGHI 

He's drummer boy of '41! 
With a Krupa composition 
And all the practicing he's 

done 
He should give competition. 



MILDRED LOPRESTI 

Teeth like gleaming peai'ls, 
Hair like raven's wings — 
Though the similes are trite, 
She has both these things. 



WALLACE MacLEAN 

He conserves his energies 
Until the recess bell, 
For then he has a thing to do 
That he must do well. 



ALFRED MARTIN 

The story's written "on his face 
For all who care to read; 
He's glad to lend a helping 

hand 
Wherever there is need. 



MARY MARVELLI 

We've examined her by X-ray: 
We report that we can't find 
A single lazy particle 
In body or in mind. 



MARTIN McAULEY 

Through our trackless corri- 
dors 
He ranges far and wide: 
We haven't yet seen Silver, 
But Bill Po's at his side. 



Page 15 



CHRISTIAN MIRANDA 

When we interviewed this 

senior. 
He didn't mind confessing 
There's little in this life of 

ours 
That he finds too depressing. 



ALVIN MONTANARI 

On sober second thought we 

feel 
We should have let him act 
As our class photographer — 
We've shown a lack of tact. 



DOROTHY MORTON 

People like us appreciate 
A person just like you, 
We hereby publicly proclaim 
We think that you're true blue. 



WARREN NEAL 

I I I : I in 

Our Warren's not particular, 
But one thing makes him sad — 
It's when the boys forget the 

"Brud" 
And call him "Fat"! Egad! 



WESLEY NICKERSON 

She may creak and she may 

groan, 
But she condescends to start — 
Though she is no gay young 

thing, 
She has captured Wesley's 

heart. 



PATRICIA O'CONNELL 

May the years be powerless 
Her smile to erase; 
For we have found joy 
In her radiant face. 



Page 16 




BETTY PADLUSKY 

The girls all envy 
Her complexion; 
In their opinion 
It's perfection. 



LAURA PAOLETTI 

She dribbles down the hockey 

field 
With a look of concentration, 
Her name heads the Honor 

Roll— 
We admire determination. 



DONALD PARSONS 

He once was "Casanova Don" 
With sweethearts by the scores, 
But then the right girl came 

along — 
And now he's scrubbing floors! 



ALBA PASOLINI 

Writing notes in study hall 

Is Alba's specialty; 

She'll pass one any time she 

thinks 
The teacher cannot see. 



DEBORAH PERRY 

She does not choose the easy 

way, 
Let the weak and weary ride — 
To her work and back again 
She walks with vigorous stride. 



ARLENE PIRANI 

Christmas spirit was in the air, 
Christmas bells were in her 

hair — 
Since the season now is gone. 
Colored bows her locks adorn. 



WILLIAM PO 

He has a repertoire of jokes 
The glum heart to delight, 
He is just the person 
To make a dark day bright. 



MARY QUINLAN 

We don't think our Mary con- 
trary; 

In fact, she always has been 

Very willing to tell us the 
news — 

And it costs us never a pin. 



MARIAN RADCLIFFE 

When the girls stroll out for 

hockey, 
You're always with the rest — 
You surprised your coach and 

team-mates, 
You rate — one of the best. 



DOROTHY RAYMOND 

You can wield a pen or pencil 
And produce a likeness true, 
The ease with which you do it 
Makes us envious of you. 



EDNA RAYMOND 

<~l Plymouth girls, 
How we do sing 
And praise the work 
Of our "right wing"! 



NANCY REAGAN 

A tisket. a tasket 

She made another basket, 

When Nancy wears that naive 

grin, 
We expect again to win. 




CLAIRE REED 

Though you search the class 

from A to Z, 
We think you won't find one 
Who'll stick more closely to a 

task 
Until it is well done. 



EDWARD RIBEIRO 

We've seen him in the class- 
room, 
We've seen him on the street — 
And from our observations 
His style is hard to beat. 



NAOMI RICHMAN 

"Naomi, be still 
For once and for all" — 
This sounds familiar 
In our study hall. 



LEE ROANE 

He helps prepare his class- 
mates 
For a detail test 
By asking all the questions 
He thinks will serve them best. 



STANLEY ROBERTS 

Stan's an unassuming chap 
Who studies hard, 'tis true, 
But with that sober air there is 
A touch of humor, too. 



BLANCHE ROBY 

We've lived through many 

changes 
In our high school days, 
But the brightness of her smile 
Has been with us always. 



Page 17 



ARDELE ROGERS 

When her children go to school 
And laugh and shout and sing, 
We only hope she won't forget 
She did the selfsame thing. 



FRANCES ROSSETTI 

"Be bright and cheerful," 
That's her creed — 
Live up to her motto 
If you would succeed. 



PATRICIA SAMPSON 

When a poet speaks of wom- 
an's hair 
As her crowning glory, 
He can have but one in mind 
As the subject of his story. 



ELIZABETH SANDERSON 

Betty, you think, is very shy 
Until you know her well — 
Then you'll find she's lots of 

fun 
As all her friends can tell. 



LOUIS SCALABRONI 

"Wrangler" bought a Pontiac, 
His one and only love — 
Don't you dare to touch that 

car 
If you haven't on a glove. 



ALICE SEARS 

Some think her sedate, 
But we wouldn't know why- 
For she has a greeting 
For each passerby. 



Page 18 




BARBARA SHAW 

Rushing here, dashing there, 
Through the corridors she'll 

tear — 
Wait a minute! This won't fit! 
Barbara's just the opposite. 



CURTIS SHAW 

The leopard may not change 

his spots 
But he does something like it — 
To recognize this boy at 1:00 
The observer must be psychic. 



FLORENCE SHAW 

She takes time to be pleasant, 
And that pays dividends — 
For now she's added all of us 
To her host of friends. 



JOHN SHAW 

On the absentee sheet 
We predict without fear 
At least once a week 
His name will appear. 



GEORGE SHEA 

Our faith in him is justified: 
We thought he had the power 
To part us from our money 
Without our feeling dour. 



MARIE SHIMMELBUSH 

She's a fugitive from History 

IV, 
It's hot upon her trail, 
The thought of being captured 
Makes Marie turn pale. 



EDITH SKULSKY 

When school is done, 
For home she'll run 
To don her slacks — 
She must relax. 



BERNIOE SMITH 

We seldom see her talking, 
She seems to us most shy — 
She concentrates on other 

things : 
Report cards do not lie. 



ESTHER SMITH 

She's simple and sweet 
And tres, tres petite; 
To her Stewart's acting 
Is life's greatest treat. 



MARY SMITH 

Her vigilance is eternal, 
Her eye is keen and clear — 
While she's serving as libra- 
rian, 
No book will disappear. 



DOROTHY SOUZA 

Seated each day at her type- 
writer, 
She merrily taps the keys 
And accomplishes her purpose 
With comparative grace and 
ease. 



FRANCIS STAS 

All that you do 

We may not condone, 

But we have only praise 

When you play the trombone. 




AUGUSTA STEFAN! 

She thinks more of landscapes 

Than many seniors do, 

In fact, she stands on Prospect 

Hill 
Just to enjoy the view. 



DEAN STEVENS 

We cover our eyes 
So we don't have to look 
At Dean in an apron 
Ready to cook. 



HAROLD STRASSEL 

In basketball, football, 
And baseball, too, 
The honor of good sport 
Goes straight to you. 



DONALD STUDLEY 

To our success at sleuthing 
We do not point with pride, 
For he must have at least one 

fault 
That cannot be denied. 



BARBARA SULLIVAN 

Riotous colors in sweaters 
Make her senses reel — 
For her only the pastels 
Have the least appeal. 



LAURA SYLVIA 

We'll lift the lid on one thing 

And let you take a peek: 

If you would meet a charming 

miss. 
You need no further seek. 



Page 19 



ELEANOR TAS'SINARI 

She bowled a score of ninety, 
And sighed with great relief— 
The second string was lower, 
Her victory was brief. 



ALICE TAVERNELLI 

Very politely we asked her to 

since — • 
"Practice Makes Perfect" was 

our first choice: 
Very politely Alice replied, 
"I subscribe to the title— but 

haven't the voice." 




RICHARD TOUPIN 

The Carver road 
Needs much repair: 
But even the old one 
Will get you there. 



EDWARD TRAVERS 

He has a sense of humor rare, 
Of that we're very well a- 

ware — 
Don't think his hearty laughs 

are bold, 
A very funny joke's been told. 



ROSE VALENZIANO 

When she really hits her 

stride. 
She can talk at such a rate 
We feel the need of a machine 
Her speed to calculate. 










/ 





MARTHA VICKERY 

The Muse of Poetry and Song 
Might well have been her 

nurse; 
Today she can provide us 
With music or with verse. 



WILLIAM VICKERY 

Time after time 
We knock them down, 
But you set them up 
Without a frown. 



BARBARA VIETS 

Stockings and sweaters 
So quickly go! 
Barbie's a knit-wit; 
That we all know! 



SHIRLEY WEEDEN 

At a game or movie 
She has a stature such 
That, unlike her midget sisters. 
She's not bothered much. 



KATHLEEN WHITE 

"Kathleen is a twin!" we say, 
And skeptical looks we bear — 
For all they have in common 
Is the color of their hair. 



LEONA VANNAH 

We can safely 
Trust her tongue: 
In the middle 
It is not hung. 



Page 20 





NORMA JEAN WHITE 

School is no place of wrath and 

tears 
But a place to work — 
And this obligation 
She's not inclined to shirk. 



BETTY WHITING 

As soothing as a gentle rain, 
As sweet as budding flower — 
With her disposition 
She needs no other dower. 



HELEN WHITING 

She makes herself useful 
In more ways than one, 
And she handles assignments 
As if they were fun. 



FREDERICK WIRZBURGER 

At the risk of seeming greedy 
We wish that we possessed 
A hundredth part of all the 

dimes 
We've paid at his behest. 




BARBARA WOOD 

If Hedy Lamarr is your ideal, 
You needn't take it so hard: 
For here we've found her 

counterpart 
Right in our own backyard. 



RICHARD WOOD 

We have a milkman in our 

class, 
His product's of the best — 
Were he himself inspected, 
"Rick", too, would pass the 

test. 



HAZEL WRIGHTINGTON 

Our attempts at reformation 
Have left us quite forlorn: 
The load of conversation 
By others must be borne. 



OLIVE WRIGHTINGTON 

A fleeting smile, 
A friendly eye — 
A modest miss 
Is passing by. 

THE CROSSROADS OF LIFE 



As we start upon our journey 
At the crossroads of our life, 

Some may fail and others conquer- 
In the stress of earthly strife. 

In our lives let's live with kindness, 
Acts of love will calm our fears — 

What we sow in life's bright 
springtime 
We shall reap in later years. 



At the portals of the future 

We now stand in silence awed — 

All our cherished hopes' fidfillment 
Rests within the palm of God. 

Let us live that each tomorrow 
Find our race with courage 
run — 
When we pass to realms of glory, 
May the greeting be "Well 
Done." 

Mary Quinlan '41 

Page 



21 




PILGRIM STAFF 

Front Row: Jeanette Franks, Pasqualina Farina, Mary Creati, Laura Paoletti, Joseph 
Lamborghini, Mrs. Raymond, Walter Corrow, Dorothy Morton, Frances Johnson, 
Barbara Viets, and Anna Scotti 

Second Row: Betty Whiting, Joan Gardner, Anne Richards, Mercy Kellen, Mary Ander- 
son, Martha Vickery, Anne Donovan, Lydia Mongan, Marian Radcliffe, Marcia Brooks, 
Naomi McNeil, Florinda Leal, Faith Millman, and Helen Correa 

Third Row: George Canucci, Bernard Kritzmacher, Roger Whiting, Stanley Roberts, 
Richard Gavone, David Hamilton, Edwin Bastoni, Richard Kearsley, Loring Belcher, 
Peter Brigida, Benjamin Brewster, and George Doten 




HONOR GROUP 

Front Row: Dorothy Souza, Helen Correa, Rosa Bradley, Mrs. Raymond, Frances John- 
son, Laura Paoletti, and Alice Tavernelli 

Second Row: Mary Iandoli, Marian Radcliffe, Augusta Stefani, Martha Vickery, Mary- 
lew Haire, Evon Briggs, Martha Lemius, Bernice Smith, and Dorothy Morton 

Third Row: Edmund Gianferrari, Idore Benati, Ruth Boutin, Nancy Reagan, Alvin Mon- 
tanari, and George Doten 

Teacher Sponsor 
Mrs. Miriam Raymond 



Founded 1923 



21 Members 



Page 22 



CLASS HISTORY MADE EASY 

SFPT OCT. NOV DEC JAN. FPB MAR. APR. HAY JUNE 




THE PRINCIPAL SPEAKS 

TN this space last year I wrote about 

courage, the quality which guaran- 
tees other traits of character, the quality 
without which other traits, no .matter 
how admirable in themselves, may be- 
come mere parodies of themselves. Let 
me repeat what I said then that you 
may understand more clearly what I 
have in mind. 

"Without courage tact may be no 
more than cowardice; forbearance, 
weakness; generosity, a covert form of 
bribery. And strength without courage 
may become mere contemptible bully- 
ing." 

The happenings of the past year have 
underscored those words in such a way 
that I want to write for this graduating 
class about another quality so closely 
related to courage that it is difficult to 
distinguish the one from the other. 

In some respects this quality may be 
considered the very heart of courage 
itself. It is difficult to conceive of cour- 
age (except as physical bravery) with- 
out assuming the existence of this other 
quality as a prerequisite. However, to 
separate this quality from courage 
(even if it can be done satisfactorily) is 
not necessary to an understanding of 
its importance or an appreciation of its 
fundamental worth in the human make- 
up. After all, it may be the twin of 



courage, the other face of courage. 
speak of self-reliance. 

Self-reliance emphasizes the alone- 
ness underlying all human existence. 
Bound as we are by ties of family, 
affection, and loyalty to so many of our 
fellow-beings, yet, ultimately, in all the 
great crises of our lives, we must be 
ready to act alone. This is not to say 
that these ties should in any respect be 
belittled, They are the great comforts, 
the supports which all men seek ; but they 
come from without, and character is 
built from within. When a man makes 
a decision, that decision must be his — 
else it is no decision at all ; it is no more 
than a concealed wavering hiding be- 
hind the advice and decisions of others, 
a masquerade. And that leads to the 
abnegation of all traits that go to make 
sound character, for it is the denial of 
a man's responsibility to himself for 
his own acts. 

Consider Greece, as last year we con- 
sidered Finland. Faced by a well-armed 
and well-equipped aggressor, remote 
from help, poor in natural resources, 
she might well have temporized as have 
her neighbors to the north, and called 
that course one of prudence, caution, 
necessity. Fine words can be found to 
camouflage this kind of spineless sur- 
render. But this ancient people remem- 
Continued on page 39 

Page 23 




>jm 



^*w 













. 1 I 



i 


/ 




/fc ^ 




\ /• 


PVI J 







We, the Class of 1941 of Plymouth High School, realizing that our high school 
life is drawing to a close, do make, publish, and declare this to be our last will and 
testament. As a token of our gratitude to the faculty, we devise and bequeath to 
them the following words of wiser men than we : 





MISS IRIS E. ALBERTINI 

0, for a seat in some poetic nook, 

Just hid with trees and sparkling with a brook. 

— Leigh Hunt 



MR. CHARLES I. BAGNALL 

His bark is worse than his bite. 

— Herbert 



MISS VIOLA M. BOUCHER 

Her that ruled the rest in the kitchen. 

— Hey wood 





MRS. MARGARET E. BROWN 

With hue like that when some great painter dips 

His pencil in the gloom of earthquake and eclipse. 

— Shelley 



MRS. BEATRICE E. GARVIN 

We have some salt of our youth in us. 

— Shakespeare 



MR. CARLO T. GUIDABOKI 

Young fellows will be young fellows. 

— Bickerstaff 





Page 26 




MISS BEATRICE A. HUNT 

A sound so fine, there's nothing lives twixt it and silence. 

— ./. S. Knowles 



MISS JEANNETTE C. JACQUES 

The vision and the faculty divine; 

Yet wanting the accomplishment of verse. 



— Wordsworth 




MISS HELEN C. JOHNSON 
0, still, small voice. 



— Old Testament 




4 




MISS LYDIA E. JUDD 
The music in my heart I bore, 

Long after it was heard no more. 



-Wordsivorth 




1 *3| ,;fs» fl 


1 


mk H 






H 


/ 


i 


HI^^^HHMh 


i J 



MISS ELIZABETH C. KELLY 

Memory, the warder of the brain. 

— Shakespeare 



MISS KATHERINE J. LANG 
Silence is golden. 



-Carlyle 




Page 27 





MISS NELLIE R. LOCKLIN 

As merry as the day is long. 

— Shakespeare 



MR. EDGAR J. MONGAN, Principal 

I am never merry when I hear sweet music. 

— Shakespeare 





MISS DORRIS MOORE 
The play's the thing. 



-Shakespeare 



MR. JOHN PACHECO 

Rejoice, young man, in thy youth. 

— Old Testament 





MR. JOHN W. PACKARD 

Fly upon the wings of the wind. 

— Old Testament 



MR. ARTHUR G. PYLE 

And I have loved thee, Ocean ! 



-Byron 




Page 28 




MISS AMY M. RAFTER 

Close as you will your eyes divine, 

Still through their lids I feel them shine. 

— Stoddard 



MRS. MIRIAM A. RAYMOND 

Reproof on her lips, but a smile in her eyes. 

— Lover 





MR. MARIO J. ROMANO 

The very hairs of your head are all numbered. 

— New Testament 







MR. RICHARD SMILEY 

Tush! Tush! fear boys with bugs. 

— Shakespeare 



""TV ., 



MR. JOHN H. WALKER 

It is not good that the man should be alone. 

— Old Testatment 



MISS MARGIE E. WILBER 

What a monstrous tail our cat has got ! 




/ s I 




— Carey 



In testimony whereof I hereunto se': my hand and, with faith in the continued 
patience and understanding of the faculty, declare this to be the last will and testa- 
ment of the Class of 1941. 

Dorothy Morton '41 



Page 29 




EH Ml Tl MW« 

This d^y 15 u°urs to test ijour worth, 

And mount one runri kbove the rest, 
Although, of pam there is no dearth 

In continents to e^st uid west, 
The CUjss of Fortu-One maui tru 

To climb the ladder of success, 
Andmao] the Qolden Me M>pli|, 

This agitation to suppress. 
Be glo.d that uou ue living here, 

And do uour best to pioneer. 

These might have been the words of one 

Who, lo 1 , these mm] uws ^.go, 
Stood staunch until the cause was von, 

Nor let this knd of ours forego 
The olorij of a. pattern bright p 

The brotherhood of state sand state, 
To spread a. light in btacKest night, 

And m this world perpetuate 
The yaJue of fc. union- one for ail, 
And at I for one. this is our cait. 
Weslev NicKerson 



Page SO 




LITERATURE 



R.Post 




PINDAR'S REVENGE 



[TH a hiss of flying spray, the sleek 
^Tittle schooner "Pindar" boomed 
over the blue water before a stiff south- 
easter. To the westward scarcely a mile 
away, the high, rounded outline of an 
island stood silhouetted in the rays of 
the setting sun. The white strip of beach 
shadowed by a fringe of tall palms that 
lined the shore, the dark green of 
bushes that ran to the top of a steep 
hill, the surf breaking on the reef that 
surrounded Sexton's Bay were plainly 
visible. 

Clint Davis squatted on the deck, his 
back against the cabin side, splicing a 
rope with a marlinspike dangling from 
his wrist. He glanced ahead as his 
vessel approached the bay. The tide 
was still flooding, coming in strong. 
Astern, a thick bank of thunderheads 
was piling up in the east. There would 
be a squall on the turn of the tide to- 
night, he was certain. It was dangerous 
for a sailing vessel to be caught in the 
narrow reaches of Sexton's Pass by a 
sudden squall. 

It had been several years since his 
last visit here. He glanced toward the 
top of Sexton's Hill. It seemed as 
though a small space on the crest had 
been cleared of bushes. He gazed in- 
tently at the bald spot above. He 
fancied he saw a figure move up there, 
but, before he could make sure, the 
movement of the boat brought a clump 
of palms between him and the hilltop. 

The man aft was steering. He stood 
up, the better to see ahead, pulling his 
hat down to shade his eyes. A heavy 
hand was needed now. If a ship struck 
on the edge of the pass, it wouldn't last 
long. The "Pindar" crossed the bar. 
Down the center of the channel the 
white schooner rolled and swung while 
the Mue-green rocks showed above the 
surface less than a cable's length away. 
The channel turned to the right and 
The "Pindar" followed the blue water 
of the passage. The little basin, entered 



through the narrow cut, was secure 
haven even during a hurricane. The 
schooner cleared the entrance and 
swung up to the north. The sails flut- 
tered as the wind left them, and the 
crew of three ably took them in. 

Clint Davis quickly tucked his knife 
back into the sheath on his belt. His 
eyes streaked along the cliff a foot 
above the surface of the water. The 
high tide mark showed plainly. He 
raised his head above the level of the 
cabintop. In the little gap between the 
main boom he saw it. A long, black hull 
was moored right in the center of the 
pond, a black sinister shape, low lying, 
with the slim muzzle of a gun pointed 
directly at them. Behind that gun stood 
two men. 

At the sight Clint Davis crouched 
and sprang overboard. The water 
closed over him, cutting off his yell of 
warning. So quickly had he moved that 
the iron marlinspike was still fastened 
around his waist. His crew was frozen 
to immovability. There came a loud, 
earspliting crash and "The Pindar" dis- 
integrated in the din which followed. 
The explosion of the five-inch shell was 
so terrific that the dory trailing astern 
flew up into the air and burst into 
splinters before it hit the water. 

Clint Davis was deep under water 
when the concussion occurred, and it 
drove the air from his lungs. He came 
up fast, caught his breath, and instinc- 
tively dived again as pieces of plank, 
rope, and timber showered the spot he 
had just left. He swam underwater to 
the beach opposite the position of the 
submarine. 

The long shadows of the setting sun 
slowly spread over the pond. With the 
sunset the wind died down. A hush fell, 
broken only by the low murmur from 
out on the reef. 

Clint Davis watched a small boat 
with half a dozen men in it put out from 
the island. He hefted the marlinspike 

Page SI 



and felt his sheath knife. If they found 
him, he'd put up a good fight. Evidently 
the crew in the small boat was convinc- 
ed that there were no survivors, for 
they went back to shore. 

Clint tried to understand this thing 
that had come upon him so suddenly. 
The lookout on the bared hilltop had 
Seen them entering the bay and had 
been ready for them. 

This must be a secret submarine base 
where the raiders went ashore to rest 
between attacks. They could not have 
found a better hideout. The hilltop 
formed an excellent lookout. They used 
swift annihilation to keep their hideout 
a secret. "Dead men tell no tales," he 
shuddered. 

Davis worked his way up from under 
the rocks. The damp, cool scent of rain 
was in the ar. On the other side of the 
pond in the light of a campfire he could 
see shadows of many men. 

A thin drizzle started to fall. He 
might be able to slip along the shore 
and escape in the small boat. But then 
he remembered his crew and his fine 
schooner at the bottom of Sexton's Bay. 
A cold rage swept over him. They had 
sunk his ship without warning and with- 
out giving anyone a fighting chance. 
He must, if possible, rid these waters 
of the black, sinister shape. But how? 

On board their vessel the raiders 
were supreme, but in Sexton's Pond 
Glint Davis was in his own environ- 
ment. He was swimming with scarcely 
a ripple to betray his progress, swim- 
ming out to the spot where the black 
shadow lay over the gray surface of 
the water. 

Even while he floated alongside, the 
rain had become a heavy downpour. 
Cautiously he worked his way along. 
Amidships near the conning tower he 
discerned the blurred figure of the 
watchman huddled against the tower. 
As silently as the fall of a feather, he 
was upon the deck and no more than 
four feet from the figure. His arm 
swung in a swift, short arc and the 
marlinspike landed on the man's skull 
with a sickening thud. He slid silently 
into the water. That one would give 
him no trouble. 

He felt for the anchor chain and slid 
down it until he came to the bottom. 
For a whole two minutes he worked on 
the shackle which held the last link 
to the huge anchor. Using his knife, he 
pried out the shackle pin and the anchor 
was loose. He floated upward. 

Page 32 



When he reached the top, he found 
the tide turning and the submarine 
drifting out the passage ! Tideborne, 
faster and faster it moved, dragging its 
useless anchor chain over the white 
coral on the bottom. He swam ashore 
and hid in the bushes close to the camp- 
fire. 

A rifle shot barked from the hilltop, 
and the men around the fire ran up to 
discover that they were stranded and 
their only means of escape was rapidly 
drifting toward the jagged reef. 

A grim smile of satisfaction crossed 
Clint Davis' face. The submarine had 
struck the reef at high water. Each 
tide would come lower and lower from 
now on. The reef held the vessel in its 
grip, and the monstrous waves were 
pounding it furiously. Each surge was 
lifting it higher upon the rocks. The 
rock formation opened large gaps in her 
bottom. 

He stole the dinghy from beside the 
campfire and was far from land before 
he was discovered. He sat down on the 
stern of the little boat and listened to 
the steady, dull roar of the reef as each 
mighty wave rose and fell upon the 
quiet of the night. He could hear still 
another sound beat above the roar of 
the sea — the sound of steel against the 
jagged rocks of the reef. They had 
destroyed his ship. The score was even. 
Their vessel was on the reef to stay. 

Clint Davis began to row. It was a 
long stretch to the settlement and the 
wireless station nearest Sexton's Bay. 
Martin McAuley '41 



WHAT PRICE LIBERTY? 

Ye who sit by the fireside, 

Come on a trip with me — 

A thoughtful trip, 

A mournful trip, 

A trip far over the sea. 

Ye who sit by the fireside, 
Pause a moment to hear 
The booming: guns, 
The chattering: g;uns, 
The g:uns of death and fear. 

Ye who sit by the fireside, 
Close your eves and see 
The flowing; blood. 
The crimson blood, 
The blood of you or me. 

Ye who sit by the fireside, 
Feel in your hearts with me 
The deepening: love. 
The lasting: love, 
The love of liberty. 

Clarence Cleveland '41 




HOLLYHOCKS 

Some spend a fortune to enhance 
Their gardens with rare and exquisite plants 
Bedecked with rocks and trailing vines; 
Some like a garden whose design 
Conforms to geometric line, 
Where brilliant phlox and asters cross 
Trim beds of pinks and columbine. 
But all of these will fail to match 
The glory of a random patch of hollyhocks. 
Pauline Freyermuth '41 



THE OLD CURIOSITY SHOP 

There's a shop around the corner, 
Quaintest one I've ever seen; 
As you enter there's the owner 
Standing where he's always been. 

This shop is not an ordinary 
Store with knicks and knacks; 
Each piece has its history 
Based on well-known facts. 

Bottles, pictures, guns, and plates, 

To name a very few; 

From more than one New England state 

And from old England, too. 

But this is all in retrospect, 
Our shop has long since gone; 
Quaint owner, too, has passed away 
But our memories live on. 

Errington Brown '41 




Page 33 




VIEUJPOinTS 



THE KIDDIES' HOUR 

"Between the dark and the daylight, 
When the light is beginning to lower, 
Comes a pause in the day's occupation 
Which is known as the Children's Hour." 

TN Longfellow's era the Children's 

Hour was that sixty minutes of de- 
lightful peace and quiet which brought 
parents and children together at the end 
of a long, long day. But that age, an age 
when parents read the time-fingered 
volumes of Aesop, Andersen, and Grimm 
to youthful, enraptured listeners, has 
given way to the present-day hour of 
parental woe. 

The radio, employing a death-defying, 
two-fisted wonder -man, now gives us a 
new form of "grim" amusement, one 
which could break any bond that ever 
existed between parent and child. If, by 
chance, you are not yet acquainted with 
the modern version of the above-men- 
tioned eventide festivity, let us look in 
on the average family at about a quarter 
to five. 

Father, weary from a hard day's toil, 
has just settled himself in his favorite 
easy-chair. Mother, too, is tired ; never- 
theless she's preparing supper with a 
smile. Junior, that little ray of sun- 
shine, has taken his nightly position be- 
fore the radio, seated on Father's fa- 
vorite foot-stool. 

Why, you may ask, has the little cher- 
ub chosen this uncomfortable seat when 
the sofa is unoccupied? Soon, all too 
soon, you shall know the answer, for 
even now the clock strikes five. Father 
squirms lower into his chair and sets 
his teeth ; mother quietly closes the door 

Page 31+ 



: into the kitchen, and Junior, tense with 
expectancy, leans toward the radio. 

Suddenly the scream of police sirens 
and the roar of gunfire herald the begin- 
ning of the "Kiddies' Hour." Father, 
completely unnerved, leaps from his 
chair, and above the din shouts, "Ye 
Gods, Mabel, do we have to endure this 
torture again tonight?" 

Mother does not reply. Again father 
pleads and again there is no reply. Now 
the noise has become a bedlam and 
father, taking matters into his own 
hands, advances menacingly toward his 
son. The lad looks for aid in the direc- 
tion of the kitchen, for father, with an 
evil gleam in his eye, is but a few feet 
away. A sharp reprimand from mother 
halts father in his tracks and saves 
Junior from eating his evening meal 
from the mantle. "Be reasonable, 
Mabel," father pleads. "Nonsense, you 
were young — once," says mother. 

Completely disgusted, father storms 
from the room, dons his coat, and, cram- 
ming his hat over his ears, leaves for 
the garage where he can read in peace. 
Junior, apparently unmoved by the 
evening's happenings, listens in com- 
plete rapture while his hero fearlessly 
upholds the forces of law and order. 
Richard Kearsley '43 



CAMERA CONVERSATION 

"You know, Jay, we lead a hard life." 

"Yes, work, work, work, and more 
work, always dangling on a strap 
around master's neck." 

"He's always banging me around, and 
focussing means twisting my nose. Some 
day, Jay, I will refuse to open my eye." 

"What makes me angry, Jack, is the 
way he opens my eye en a beautiful 
landscape and shuts it before I can 
absorb the beauty." 

"Yes, and when I am forced to view 
a corpulent, homely, woman, he tor- 
tures me by leaving my eye open. Then 
she criticizes for not making a good 
picture! I'm not a magician!" 

"Poor me, master is always opening 
my head and putting in a new brain or 
pulling out a used one." 

"Ah, Jack, but with a color brain, 
beautiful scenery, and a pretty girl — 
that is a diffef ent matter !" 

"Right you are, Jay. Even a camera 
has its big moments!" 

Robert Govoni '43 



WAITING 

^H Y doesn't that teacher hurry ? He's 
probably glad that I'm getting a 
deficiency slip, but I'll do better next 
time. Yeah, that's what I said the last 
time, but now I mean it! Gee, I really 
meant it last time, but that resolution 
went the way of all resolutions when 
pals come to call. I should have known 
better than to think I could make up 
everything in one test. 

Look at him! He's three rows away 
now ! If I don't get a deficiency slip this 
time, I'll study two hours every night. 
Oh, what's the use of kidding myself? I 
said that the first time I was threatened 
with one of those unpleasant reminders, 
but here I am waiting for another. 
What shall I tell my father, a stickler 
for excellent grades? My three C's last 
month didn't improve our relationship 
at all. 

I'll consult some of the boys as to 
what I should say. No, they'll laugh. I 
know what I'll do — I'll leave the slip 
on the hall ta'ble, for anything that I'll 
say will only make the situation worse. 
I was a fool, but what's the use now? 

Look at those smug teacher's pets 
over there, the "brainy" boys, the ones 
who never have to worry. I'm every bit 
as intelligent as they are. No — no, I 
can't be, for they know when to study 
and I'm sitting here wishing that I had 
studied. Funny thing — I always know 
what I should have done but never know 
what I should do. 

He's coming up the aisle now. He 
seems to enjoy giving out those little . 
tokens and making little speeches. I bet 
he beats his wife. Four more boys, three 
now, two. Gosh ! 'he's talking to Brown 
in front of me. He's standing over me 
now ! I won't encourage him to speak to 
me. No, sir! I'll look at my book and 
pretend I'm studying ! Well, why doesn't 
he put it down? Why is he prolonging 
the torture? 

Heavens ! he's passed me ! 

Gladys Cohen '43 



FIRESIDE CONTENTMENT 

Outside I hear the dashing rain 

Full force against the windowpane; 
On such a day with fire aglow, 

An easy chair, a book or so, 
To sit and munch an apple red, 

And now and then to nod my head; 
What more is there for me to say? 

Content am I this rainy day. 

Rosa Bradley '41 



ON SNEEZING 

J-JAVE you ever heard one person 
sneeze and then heard another re- 
mark, "God bless you"? This expres- 
sion has come down through the ages. 
In the ancient days it was believed that 
the reason a woman was beautiful was 
because she had been born at the very 
moment that Venus sneezed. Socrates 
was careful to watch the side to which 
he sneezed. He believed that to sneeze 
to the right was good luck, and that 
any proposition undertaken afterward 
would turn out in the sneezer's favor. 
Sneezing to the left meant bad luck. 

There are countries today that have 
superstitions on sneezing. In Germany, 
for a married man to wake up and 
sneeze means that he will be bossed by 
his wife for one week. This can be 
warded off by going back to bed and 
staying there for three hours. If a 
person sneezes in Scotland, he is not 
an idiot because the Scots believe that 
an idiot does not have the power to 
sneeze. Sneezing at a Hindu sacra- 
mental rite means that the ceremony 
has to be begun over again. The Chinese 
believe that it is bad luck to sneeze on 
a Chinese New Year. In Japan, the 
number of times one sneezes has sig- 
nificance. To sneeze once means some- 
one is praising you, to sneeze twice 
means that an enemy is slandering you, 
and to sneeze three times means you're 
getting a cold. The last is perhaps the 
most dependable forecast. 

Elsie Salmi '42 




Page 35 




fl-fW fourth period ,KVrfje races 
OUL.T of C.U35 and fu-^tf^ doum 



the "^cps liKe KgVitvimi 



i'oic«L listen "to a voKt.B^i <Ao « £«uJ 



"tin S a xaYY^ tola's a^: tVic 



-tvr 



>5avrse ""t\*"r^« 



H* enca 1 /? >_> ei c»" -tW bar 
In tVioi c©f c^arrTa and 



"5r>o^ 



|r>4o 



Gives too mocK to trk<z 
avev^uIeSt for c^anefe* 




m ., ■?«■«"' "tjn»- pir^r iro tVi 



hoots 



1 -fchfl 



sraVrs 



loots <-»p ■ 

second, -fro-^th* 



■5<2coo<i -to the. ^K\rd ^Ioot, cnnoH>Ha-.o^ Vit^ o>a\ ors'tb^ LOau 
C3 a> 1 




[ft<S?e 

C 
open<? 

"two I 



Sis - e. 



o-to "the baVeon^ ©4- "t^>e au<i\ V e 









Page 36 



*vimor 



J^oetm J^c 



u i" aa 



aae 



TROUBLED WATERS 

The Ship of State sails out to sea 
While anxious hearts await on shore — 
Can she return to land still free, 
Or is she lost forevermore? 

The hoary captain charts his course, 
The ship ploughs bravely toward her foe: 
Will she fall prey to hostile force 
Or conquer? Only God can know. 

Mary Goddard '42 



MUSIC 

To a frivolous girl 
'Tis a symbol of joy, 
Of moonlight and roses 
And maybe — a boy. 

To a downhearted male 
'Tis a breathtaking swirl 
Of powder and perfume 
And maybe — a girl. 
Edward Oavicchi '42 



NIGHT 

Kind Morpheus his cloak has flung 
O'er weary land and sea. 
The stars are twinkling in the sky, 
The moon's sweet, soft, and silver face 
Is smiling tenderly. 

The waves along the shining shores 

Are sighing, "Sleep, sweet sleep;" 

And through the dark the night birds call — 

So silent is the world that lies 

In slumber soft and deep. 

Jeanette Franks '4? 



BOY 

Blushes, a grin, 

Voice that goes thin; 
Feet hard to guide, 

Hands meant to hide. 

Shuffled down heels, 
Mind off in space; 

Eating all meals 

At breathtaking pace. 

Mischief, not sin, 

Peach-fuzzy skin; 
Unruly hair, 

Quick taking a dare. 

Pausing to glance, 
Baggy brown pants; 

Opened-necked shirts, 
Always says "nerts." 

Dressed now so neatly, 
Years bring conceit; 

Forgotten completely 

His large hands and feet. 

Self-consciousness gone, 
Confidence born. 



ROSETTA BOYNTON '42 



CALL TO ADVENTURE 

I've wandered along life's winding trail 

Until now I am seventeen, 
But as yet I have seen or done nothing great 

Aside from life's daily routine. 

But before I die I have planned in my mind 

The things I shall want to do, 
To visit the places which few men have seen 

And learn why some things are true. 

The wish that is first in my mind it to find 
Where the rainbow touches this earth, 

And there I shall meet with that famed pot 
of gold 
To return to find what it's worth. 

My next request is an adventurous trip 
That takes me down under the sea, 

To find all the treasure which pirates have 
left 
And carry it back home with me. 

Finally I wish to be able to see 

This great world one hundred years hence, 
With the hustle and roar of wide city streets 

Brought close to my own backyard fence. 

George Canucci '42 



Page 87 



FEMALES + FIRE 
PVERY year there comes a time when 
the garden rubbish, your rubbish, 
and the neighbor's rubbish, which very 
accidentally clutters up your yard, must 
be disposed of by the well-known pro- 
cess of rapid oxidation. It is generally 
preferred by the fire department and 
the insurance company that a man burn 
the rubbish, as a woman with a long- 
handled rake and three or four lucifers 
is more dangerous than a leaky water 
pipe in the cellar. 

Unfortunately there are many "fem- 
inine firebugs" who have yet to learn of 
the delicate composition of a burning 
heap, and one of the chief offenders is 
Mrs. Twerp, my next-door neighbor. If 
she can find no old rubbers to be dis- 
posed of, she will certainly pick up a 
piece of old oilcloth, which makes a very 
good substitute, especially if an unpleas- 
ant odor is desired. There is, of course, 
nothing that emits such an offensive 
smell except hair, but hair being rare in 
backyards, we must acknowledge that 
a piece of old oilcloth about three feet 
or more in length, subjected to a slow 
flame, can be detected by the most 
ordinary nose even at a distance of four 
gardens away. 

What rubbish Mrs. Twerp does ac- 
cumulate in one corner of her cabbage 
patch scarcely compensates for the dam- 
age to herself, the rake, and Oscar 
Blurp, the lone spectator who waits too 
long before taking a flying leap over the 
fence. 

The star performance occurs when 
her skirt gets entangled in the garden 
implement. Provoked and disgusted, 
Mrs, Twerp then leaves her cabbage 
patch and accumulation of waste and 
goes into the house, depositing the rake 
at the foot of the back stairs with teeth 
upward. 

William Dern '43 



WORK 

We have not known you as we ought, 

Nor learned your wealth and health and pow'r. 

The easier way has been our thought, 

While waning was our youthful hour. 

We have not tried you as we ought, 

But left our duties just half-done: 

We've feebly struggled, feebly fought 

For chances lost or barely won. 

When we shall know you as we ought, 

(Oh! Urge our zeal, and force our might!) 

When we've your presence warmly sought, 

Then we may toil and serve aright. 

Martha Vickery '41 
Page 38 



LEND ME YOUR EARS! 

P^ PEARL fell in love with a trumpet 
and this is no fairy tale. They may 
be seen as often as you please strolling 
on the third floor at recess time. 

Griswold and Fuller discovered that 
it was to their best advantage to hunt 
after school hours. If you play hookey, 
you are obliged to sit patiently in your 
home room after 1 :05 until your time is 
made up. Just to prove that crime 
doesn't pay, ask Donald or Fred what 
they bagged on their respective hunting 
trips. 

"Oh, how I hate to get up in the morn- 
ing!" is the wail of a good-looking chap 
in 201. He ought to be called "Hair- 
breadth Harry" instead of Joseph be- 
cause of his frequent breathtaking 
dashes across the room to avoid being 
marked late. 

We have a strong suspicion that some 
of the boys in Plymouth are slipping 
badly. Eddie, a junior from Carver, is 
carelessly, or we should say casually, 
tampering with the hearts of many a 
young maiden. 

Everyone knows "Kiyi", but very few 
persons were aware of the unfortunate 
plight he was in a few months ago. 
When Old Man Winter rounded the 
corner this year, Robert's family gave 
him strict orders that he either raise his 
marks or raise his iceboat on jacks. 

When Teddy Martin came back to 
school after his enforced absence, a cer- 
tain girl in the front row of 201 seemed 
very anxious to offer Ted help in mak- 
ing up his work or anything else that he 
was a little behind on. 

"Flossie" has at last shed her long 
pigtails. Although this may have been 
a sacrifice, the result is extremely satis- 
factory. 

If ever any of the class of '42 gets into 
difficulty with the law during the next 
ten years, we need have no fear. We 
have in our midst William Gault, future 
chief of police, and George Canucci, 
destined to be a judge, so how can we 
lose? 

Mr. Bagnall believes very strongly 
that Mr. Smiley's pickled cats have 
stolen the tongues of quite a few of his 
junior history students. Could this be 
the reason for their failure to recite in 
class ? 

Beware, girls of Plymouth High! 
Those two roadside Romeos are on the 
loose again. These affectionate bad men 
are known to us as "Sheik" Pickard and 
"Handsome" Hayward. 



Who says that there's no such thing 
as "oomph"? If Agnes and Muriel 
haven't a couple of miles of the stuff, 
the boys would like to know what to 
name their bewitching — er — ah — smile. 

Hatton, or Beau Brummel, has been 
seen, to the dismay of not a few towns- 
people, rubbing fenders with strange 
cars. This unavoidable weakness of 
Al's is greatly decreasing the trade-in 
value of his father's Studebaker. 

Boudrot certainly has us baffled ! This 
column is confined to comments about 
juniors, but we are at our wit's end to 
discover whether Bernard is a junior, 
sophomore, or senior. Even Bernie him- 
self doesn't know. 

Ladies, please don't let Mitchell's sta- 
ture discourage or deceive you. He's ir- 
resistibly sweet and not at all shy 
about sitting in your lap. 

If you have not been mentioned in this 
column, don't feel slighted. You're either 
such a good junior that we can find no 
flaw in you — or your escapades are un- 
printable. Richard Gavone '42 



THE PRINCIPAL SPEAKS 

Continued from page 23 

bered its days of glory, and chose to 
resist aggression because it is man's 
right and duty to defend his freedom. 
Her men, poorly armed and ill-supplied, 
met the invader without waiting for 
assistance from outside to come to them. 
They made their decision and acted up- 
on it, and, though help has come to them 
since, the glory of their resistance is 
that they made it themselves; they re- 
lied upon their own strength. 

Success in a military sense has so far 
crowned their efforts ; they have pushed 
back the invader and have penetrated 
his territory. But ominous doings in the 
Balkans foreshadow the day of disaster 
when valiant Greece may have to feel 
the heel of the conqueror. May that 
day never come, but, should it come, 
posterity will say of this Greek nation 
what history tells us was graven in the 
rocky walls of Thermopylae over the 
bodies of Leonidas and his Spartans: 
"Stranger, go tell our people that we lie 
here in obedience to their laws." 

Now, we are "their people" as are all 
liberty-loving, self-reliant men, and the 
"laws" are those of decent right-conduct 
expected of all citizens in a free nation. 
May we, with their example before us, 
be as steadily and sturdily self-reliant 
in our defense of all that is right. 

Edgar J. Mongan 



TOO MUCH GOING ON 

There's too much going on at once 
In this old world of ours — 
So many things for us to do 
In few and fleeting hours. 

We have no time to meditate, 
We make plans as we go, 
And what we'll do week after next 
We never, never know. 

A hair-do here, then movies there, 
And dinner is at six, 
And we must be on time for all — 
This living has its "tricks." 

From school we dash home for our lunch 
And down town then rush we, 
To talk and shop and hurry off 
To somewhere else at three. 

Our supper's through by seven-ten; 
Our homework' s done by eight, 
And someone's car is at the door — 
Ah, yes — another date! 

We live from day to day, 'tis true, 
We go from sun to sun; 
We know there's too much going on, 
But oh! It's so much fun! 

Jeanette Franks '42 




THE IRON MONSTER 

I, by rights should be in bed. 

Ere I rest my weary head, 
Iron Monster must be fed. 
Down two flights of stairs I go, 

Ducking rafters that are low, 
Kicking railings with my toe. 

There he sits before my eyes, 

Glutton of gargantuan size, 
Empty, not to my surprise. 
"Here," he roars in rasping tone, 

"Here I sit and hungry groan. — 
Feed me here upon my throne!" 

Shovel, shovel, dust and trouble, 
Bended back that's almost double 

With my labor midst the rubble. 

Iron Monster, god of greed, 
I'll no more to cellar speed, 

On crude oil you now must feed. 

Walter Corrow '41 

Page 39 



Jsnvi 



itatl 



ion 



RULER OF THE SEA 

Sweeping ever onward 

With thunderous, furious roar, 

Mountains of frothy madness 

Crash on the wreck-strewn shore. 

Until Father Neptune 

Deigns to calm the raging deep, 

These crushing monsters will continue 

To pit their cunning and strength 

Against the courageous men 

Who have fearlessly striven 

To conquer the bitter, mysterious sea. 

Edward Penn '43 



HOPE REKINDLED 

With cheerless heart I watched the sun 
As it came up to greet the day, 
And the shadows of the night just passed 
Lingered a while, then blew away. 

Then all the birds began to sing, 
And all the flowers burst into bloom, 
And heaven smiled at her handiwork- 
There ivas no place for tears and gloom. 

And as I stood alone and sad, 
A ray of hope gleamed from the sod: 
My heart leaped up! I caught the gleam — 
Then raised my head and thanked the Lord. 
Mary Capozucca '43 



THE MESSENGER 

On a fence post 

Chirping 

Sits a robin 

Pert and happy — 

Bubbling 

With his secret 

Of coming spring. 

Norma Johnson '43 



MIST 

The mist is like a silvery veil 

Dropped o'er steeple tops 

Where it hovers, floating languidly — 

Then gradually, it fades away 

As if a hand were reaching down 

To gently lift it up. 

Betty Hart '43 



MEDITATION 

These things would I hold to be, 

Above all else, most dear to me: 
Pussy willows — silky, silver-gray 
Swaying in the breeze along the woodland 

way; 
Walks along a forest path 
Rather than the fireside hearth; 
The pungent tang of crisp, brisk air 
All around me everywhere ; 
The frosty twinkle of a star 
Glistening brightly from afar; 
The broad expanse of virgin snow 
Sparkling in the moonlight glow. 
The peace that follows quiet sleep 
That has been restful, calm, and deep; 

These things would I hold to be, 

Above all else, most dear to me. 

Shirley Hanson '43 



MY PLEA 

Never be too busy to gaze at sea-blue skies, 
To watch the sun stream on its way to seek 

lost lullabies, 
To mark the shadows of the dark 071 velvet 

feet creep down, 
To see the stars, which one by one, light 

streets of Heaven-town. 

Never be too busy to see life's flowers sweet, 
The kinds that bloom in gardens, and the 

others at our feet, 
The joy of books, of friends, and talk, the 

love of children dear — 
The charm of all the lovely things that noiv 

surround us here. 

Never be too busy to see beauty everywhere, 
And know that He Who loves us all has 
made this ivorld most fair. 

Mary Bonzagni '43 



Page UO 



to 



& 



eau 



t 



\i 



TWILIGHT AT SEA 
The twilight hours like birds flew by 
As gently and as free; 
Ten thousand stars were in the sky, 
Ten thousand on the sea — 
For every wave with dimpled face 
That leaped into the air 
Had caught a star in its embrace 
And held it, trembling, there. 

Barbara Standish S'herman '43 



MEMORIES 
Gazing into the fire I see 

Little flames of memory, 
P easant dreams of days gone past, 

Never, never meant to last — 
Seeds of reminiscence sown 

Into mem'ries dear are grown; 
They fill my heart with ecstasy, 

These little flames of memory. 

Helen Sherman '43 



AWAKENING 

Roguish rain — 

Seeking out the backward plants, kissing 

them gently, 
Making those bashful bulbs blush into 
bloom. 
Happy sun — 

Caressing the new-born shoots as they 

Bravely poke 
Their tender leaves up into this land of 
light and life. 
Playful winds — 

Frolicking amongst the goblet tulips that 
hold their cupped hands toward the sky, 
Causing them to sway with the easy 
rhythm of the ballet. 

Barbara Jones '43 



BEFORE I DIE 

I want to hear before I die 

From a host of angels in the sky 

Those treasured words men seek in vain, 
"All is well — peace rules again." 

I want to see before I die 

That hallowed shrine where patriots lie, 
Where they who stemmed the battle's tide 

Now rest in state, our country's pride. 

I want to know before I die 

Why men grow pale as years go by, 

And if there is a Shangri-La 
Beyond the last horizon far. 

I want to stand before I die 

And look the whole world in the eye, 

Then turn with mind and conscience clear 
To face my God without a fear. 

Richard Kearsley '43 



SOARING GULLS 

They glide through the air 
With the greatest of ease, 

Those daring white creatures 
That live by the seas. 

They soar to the clouds 
To a measureless height, 

Cruising among them 
Until out of sight. 

Then swerving about 

They pause to hover, 
Then plummet towards water 

One after another. 

They hit with a splash 
In search of their prey, 

Then, bobbing like corks, 
They drift on their way. 

Bernard Kritzmacher '43 



Page il 



PRIZE BOUQUET 




Page 42 



lnese are the prize-winning pictures in the 

lAndid lAraer*. lontest sponsored Li] lhe fugritn, 
1ST PRIZE-VINCENT BARRATTA 
2ND PRIZE -ALVIN tlONTANARI 
3RD PRIZE -ALFRED MARTIN 

JUDGES -MR. CARLO qillDABOM 
FRANCES DRETLE.R 
BERNARD KRITZMACNER 



03 

a 



43 
be 
S 
© 






43 






ft 

c* 

■p 
-e 

be 

S 

e 

JS 
Eh 



; It 
I- 






Oe- 

Si* 



x£ 

OJ*^ 

3 a> 
43 

43 
-p co 



3 

cu 
43 



a 

o3 

3 
40 



c- .3 . 






■3 
:"3 3 



2-? 



rt ^ 



[T" bee- 



_ > . 

cS 03 ; 

WW : 



t 
o 

p. 



-p 

be 

>> 

CU . 

43 cu 



03-3 

OJ T3 43 

-C 03 [fl 



-P >; ® 

W 5j43 



^£ £ 






M 

•r-i SH 

o 

to-r-' 

>>&H 

CS 

Ji -P 



3 cj 

os 5 

o 42 
l-l o 

rt . be 

"cu T3 



oS 

>i 

oS 
ft 



pq 



3 
03 



is 

: -P 
: W 

:43 
in 

oj 
: (h 

'. «H 
03 
O 



o 



CU 

> ' 
03 — 

!i T3 
J-3 n 



to [> 



60 . 

3 £ 

cu 
03-^ 
*" oj F» |43 

i <u » o 3 






■ -p 



03 oj 

-P hi. 



C-. 03 ,. 

-p t> 
" "0t> 



-j O 
.M 43 






e— 
>> 

a> 

43 



u 

03 

43 



,2 o 
43 "a! 
> 43 



43 



O 

o 



M 

co 

m 



W PQ 



4* 
oj 



T3-Q 
OJ 
03 fU 

m > 
oj oS 
343 

oj-3 



> CO 

T3«3 
CU _ 

^ ° 3 w 
oj43o w OJj^oj^' 



S cH . 

>. b£ , 

S-IT3 3 

CU .Q „ 

*• & 

oj cS Jc 



& 



CO 



a . 

£43 
43 to 

..ft 

if £ 

.S ° 

^ CJ 

CC oS 

.2 o 



« CS 



OJ -p 
U oS 

fe c^ 



: +* 
. o 



cS*" 
>c^ 

£ m 



S.5 . K-3 

PhOxW Sue 



C T3 
cS 03 



53 * 



2 

o 



03 
43 



a 



3 
o 






5X1 . 
S c«C 

3 c 
Is 2 

OJ o 



cS J-< co 
-p »hS 

cS'S U 3- 
43 «1 8 £ 

^ Cfl fJ O 

5^ >> o 

^J» cS 
O JT 43 

Z^h5 



cu33 



<J =u 3 
43 * 

o« & 

43 > £ 

CO O 

So « 

.-ST3 «H 
3 CU CO 

CT C cu 

l-H CS g 

-iJ 3 

■—i im 

'5 S CO 

o 

^ s 

CO *rH 

cS-^ 

ft 
™ S * 

. CJ g 

- co C 



«H- 



CO >.. 

tX cS 

.£ ^ 

T3 cS 



43 

CO 



43^2 
2 42 



03 

>i 
cS 
ft 

-P 

CO 

f-i 

^ ■ O 
OJ T3 

■sz: £ 

co — cS 
— — 43 s 

3 ^ e aj 

^^ P-* 
C33i oS 

^ar £ 



"3 
3 
03 



3 
oj 
3 



CM 

>-.co 



■ p5 Ph 



o. -O cu 

cu 343 
3 BJ-^ 

3 o 
»-s o-o 

0*° o 
" o-» 

'3-^43 

43^ 3 

u o ° 
w g 3 
n ^ cu 

^435 
m be bt . 

>> 3 c ^ 

43 2 ? ^ 



o 
43 

bi 

3 



£ a 

■g CS 

CO CO 

2 3 

v ^-. CU 

cu cj c 

43 oj o 

-p ,cT3 



43 

o 



3 
M 

T3 
3 
cS 



cu 

3 
cS 



: Ue- _ 

cu B'3 
^ S o 

4^- +J 

co i ? _ 43 
co cu C o 

3^°2 
•3. 4<! £ 

§ 3 P « 

3 J? cS O 
PQO42W 



T3 




3 




cS 




>! 




03 




P= 




OJ 


X 


43 


-P 
CS 




01 


CO - 




• l-l •■ 


O 




-p 



bC 
3 

'S 
3 

'S 

j 



cS 

tx 

cS 

b£ 

3 
3 
o 
>-. 

cu 
43 



43* 



CS 

hr CU 

CJ .3 O 
oS o »- 
PQ-3P0 



be 
3 

'S 

o 
£ 

a_s 

cu 3 

42 •" 

3 a 
o « 
O^i 
tn m 

^ cy 

•sa 

"* o 

to CO 

3 ^ 

-p *p 

•2 & 
«**►? 



-3 : 




3 : 
03 • 


CO 
CU 




+J 


CO 




3 : 


03 


43 : 


£ 


+f 


+J 


^ ; 


CO 


- -p 


43 
O 


CO 


OJ 


a j 


CO 



43 


>) : 


-P 


OJ 

43 : 
+? 





+" o 



be . 
3t3 

J 03 
5 43 



3 
1 

Q 



CO Pi 
CO O 

03 O 
]> 

+? OJ 
CO 4- 

42T 

CO CJ 
„4<J'0 

fca. CS o 

^M be 



cu 

:43 

3 
o 
o 



3 

g, 03 
be a 
cs^ 

^i CO 

CS43 

P9U 



3 
O 
O 
CO 

o 






fa 

cu 
J3 
H 



3 
'-p 

cu 
45 

3 



_. cu 
03 o 

& p 
03 pq 

pq . 



s §§ 



03 
O 



U 



3 
o 
43 

oS 
3 

'3 
o 



co 3 

cu o 

3 co 

e C 3 

3 2-S 

,3 JS o 



-3 

3 



sss s 



>■ beji 
S So 
cu 03 o 

«pj.-q 



sss 



T" -P 



j? a 

_ 6f 

03 g O 



C3=« 

P^Ph 



ss 



Pm 



cS 



-3 
§0 

3 P 
P cS 

5' £ 
Pc3 <5 



S SS 



OJpi 






OJ 
43 



Pagre A3 



L^IHSIBH 




Our Christmas tree no longer gleams 

With brightly-colored stars and lights. 

We packed the trimmings for next year, 

But still, we kept the tree just near 

The house, so we could all look out 

And see it there, quite cold, without 

Its branches, laden, shining bright 

With tinsel and a star. One night, 

However, after a day's storm, 

When the eaiiji seemed to change its form 

And I looked out through the moonlight glare, 

I saw our tree, still standing there, 

Its branches once more hanging low, 

Redecorated by the snow. 

Mary Marvelli '41 

NOSTALGIA 

While gazing from my window's height, 

I see the frozen harbor's shore. 

And high above the sandy bar, 

White seagulls swoop, then rise and soar. 

Beyond the bar the white crests rise, 

Made high by last night's boisterous storm, 

From depths of sapphire blue they roll, 

A magic change of hue to form. 

Across the brown of winter's marsh, 

The distant roar is borne to me — 

I long for summer's bright green shades 

And sails, instead of icy sea! 

Barbara Viets '41 



WIND SONGS 

How often have I heard the wind 

When I am all alone, 

Puffing past my windowpane 

With wailing, doleful tone. 

It seeks out each secluded nook 

While blowing through the lane, 

And then, once more, around the house 

It whistles a refrain. 

Sometimes it plays a softer tune 

And gathers up each breeze. 

Then, in a muffled whisper, 

It vibrates through the trees. 

It lingers in the tall, brown grass, 

The bushes, and the brush — 

And then moves on to other haunts 

With a reluctant hush. 

How often, when I listen, 

I've heard the wind at play — 

And hoped that it would hasten 

To me, another day). 

Elenore Hall '41 
Page UU 



MORNING SCENE 

I love these frosty mornings 

When all the outer air 
Is tingling with a freshness 

And vim beyond compare. 
The cold wind in the tree-tops 

Proclaims the coming dawn, 
And sends the leaves a-rushing 

Across the frozen lawn. 
The light glows in my window, 

And on the pane I see 
Jack Frost has sketched a picture 

Of a silvery tree. 
I love these frosty mornings 

To see these things, and then 
To draw my bed-clothes closer 

And go to sleep again. 

Nancy Reagan '41 



MEMORIES 

As I recall the many years I've risen 
And bathed and brushed my teeth 
and combed and dressed. 
How many years within these different schools 
I've tried and toiled, how many years 
oppressed; 
For all these recollections, I thank thee, Lord! 

Please never let me rest — 
Until I've reached that peace that comes 
In toiling for the best. 

Mary Creati '41 



MOMENTARY BLISS 

Happiness is a transient thing, 
A variegated balloon on a string 
Suspended in the air to tantalize 
Each soul that hopelessly tries 
To grasp its bounded ecstasy. 
Eventually it bursts, and we 
In retrospect then treasure 
Its momentary pleasure. 

Laura Paoletti '41 



ON TIRELESS WINGS 

On tireless wings the wild bird speeds his 
flight 
To lands which he has often sought before: 
On t ever on, untiring, day and night, 

Unceasing, ever toward that distant shore 
Where lies his shelter from the cold wind's 
roar. 
Strong is the hope that leads him through the 
skies 
And true the sense that guides him evermore, 
As on toward that alluring realm he flies 
Where winter is like spring, for there his 
haven lies. 

Martha Lemius '41 




#/**?* % *#/*** 




7- V y 



JobnTittj gets shut ma. locher. 





J 1 / 




■Citr- <£ 







ITS AD 
Ili THE , 
GAME* 



fin afternoon ui'th JLo»-/ng Gilmer-. 




f ^ \ 

(r\ v "A 



L ^M 



x p!c 




U*jA fa~*m\ 



i^M 



^mU~*_< v 




Come on 
"AeWet"/ 



£ 



A\* 



MOM- 



•W^ */ W^frJ^^**^" 



f\bout to maHe another g> 03 , 




Mum n<-fci/ 

Page 4-5 




FOREIGN 



LANGUAGES 




L'AVENIR 

Les personnages: Julie et Renaud 

La premiere scene : C'est le salon fab- 
uleux d'un bateau a vapeur. Tous les 
fauteuils sont verts comme la mer au- 
dela des fenetres, petites et rondes. Le 
tapis meme est vert. 

Ici il y a beaucoup de monde, et tous 
parlent de ce nouveau bateau et com- 
ment il est comme un grand hotel. Tout 
le monde semble heureux. Quelques-uns 
sont des hommes d'affaires. D'autres 
voyagent pour leur plaisir. II y a des 
criminels, des membres du clerge, des 
riches, de nouveaux-maries. 

Quand le rideau se leve, nous voyons 
deux de ces derniers. Julie, petite et 
seduisante, a, a peu pres, vingt-deux 
ans. L'homme, Renaud, est grand et 
melancolique, et est un peu plus vieux 
que sa femme. lis parlent tout bas 
comme s'ils etaient seuls au monde. 

Renaud: Julie, tu ne regrettes pas 
notre mariage? Tu aurais pu etre plus 
heureuse avec un autre — . 

Julie: Eh bien, Renaud! De quoi 
parles-tu? Je ne serais pas ici, si je ne 
t'aimais pas. 

Renaud : Je te ferai si heureuse quand 
nous retournerons a Paris. — Mais, dan- 
sons, Julie? C'est un bon orchestre. 

Julie: Oui. 

C'est une valse. Us dansent si bien 
ensembe, si graoieusement, comme dans 
un reve! Us oublient le salon, les fau 
teuils verts, les hommes, et les f emmes — . 
Mais la musique s'arrete. 

Renaud: Julie, allons sur le pont. 
Bien, attends-moi ici. 

Quand le rideau se baisse, Renaud est 
alle a sa chambre pour leurs habits, 
parce que l'air de la nuit est un peu 
fraiche. 

La seconde scene. 

C'est le pont du bateau. Julie et 
Renaud pres du rail, regardent l'ocean 
et les cieux obscurs. Us ne parlent pas. 
Us sont contents. L'avenir est dans 

Page 46 



leurs esprits, et ils pensent a ce qu'ils 
feront ensemble a New York et a Paris 
plus tard. 

Mais la nuit est fraiche et Julie fri- 
sonne. Elle leve son manteau du rail et 
ils s'en vont. Le manteau a cache une 
ceinture de sauvetage, et quand Julie 
l'a leve (son manteau). nous pouvons 
voir les mots, "S. S. Titanic," en noir 
sur le blanc. 

Les lumieres s'eteignent et le rideau 
se baisse. Martha Vickery '41 

L'AFFAIRE DE LA PIPE 
QUI MANQUE 

Le vieillard Prudhomme a perdu sa 
pipe! Oh, quelle dommage! Oh, c'etait 
trop fort! Oui, la grande pipe, sa pipe 
favorite, elle avait disparu. Ou etait- 
elle? Sans sa pipe le vieux Prudhomme 
etait ruine. Cette pipe etait son amie, 
son compagnon de vieillesse. En ete et 
aussi en hiver i'l s'asseyait et fumait 
sur son seuil ou a son atre, content, 
lan^ant des bouffees odoriferantes. Mais 
maintenant, il etait seul, il lui fallait 
trouver ce compagnon vite, tout de suite 
ou il deviendrait fou. 

Mais le pauvre Prudhomme n'etait 
pas capable de la chercher tout seul. 
Son rhumatisme le troublait continuel- 
lement. Le bon chalumeau seulement 
etait capable de rapetisser la peine et 
maintenant il ne l'avait pas. Peut-etre 
le petit Dominique, son neveu, l'assiste- 
rait a la trouver. Ah, oui, Dominique, le 
petit garcon ! C'etait la la reponse. Oui, 
Dominique etait si bon, si obligeant, 
quelquefois. 

M. Prudhomme s'ecria doucement 
d'abord, "Dominique, Dominique," alors 
plus fort. "Venez, Dominique, s'il vous 
plait." Dominique, cependant, n'est pas 
venu. II faut que le pauvre vieillard 
aille le chercher. Prudhomme s'est leve 
peniblement, boitant a la salle voisine. 
La etait Dominique, le petit, sa figure 
defiguree avec agonie. tissee avec stu- 
peur. La fumee emplissait l'air. Dans 



la bouche etait la pipe archivieille. 

M. Prudhomme, hebete, mais heureux 
a la decouverte, a dit, "Eh, Dominique, 
moi, j'ai trouve ma pipe, mais vous, 
vous avez trouve le demon interieur." 
Walter Corrow '41 



LES SENTIMENTS D'UN 
FRANQAIS 

La Place de la Concorde. Un vieil 
homme se promene lentement. C'est 
Jerome Trevant, vendeur de pain. Re- 
gardant dans son panier, il soupire. 

Jercme — "Ah! Quels jours tristes 
pour les Francais! Et quels pains mis- 
erables que je dois vendre! Pas fait 
avec la farine comme aux bons vieux 
jours. Mais le pain n'est pas la seule 
chose qui ait change avec cette domi- 
nation allemande. Paris a change; tout 
a change. Les rues resonnent avec les 
bottes des Nazis. Comme ils sont gal- 
ants ces jours-ci ! Offrant de porter mon 
panier et m'assistant a traverser la rue. 
Mais ils ne peuvent pas nous duper a 
nous isoumettre ! Nous avons trop endure 
de ces voleurs pour oublier facilement!" 

Soupirant encore, le vieux vendeur 
de pain, sa tete baisse en meditation, 
traverse pres de l'Arche et marche vers 
le soleil couchant mourant. 

Patricia O'Connell '41 



A L'ECOLE EN ANGLETERRE 

Je vais decrire l'ecole ou j'ai pour- 
suivi mes etudes en Angleterre pendant 
trois ans. 

C'est une plus petite ecole que cette 
ecole-ci, avec seulement trois cents 
eleves. Des evacuees de Londres ven- 
aient la pour la duree de la guerre, et 
une autre ecole, l'ecole William Ellis, 
pour les garccns de Londres, employ- 
aient nos batiments rapres-midi. 

Les eleves commencent quand ils ont 
onze ou douze ans, et ils sortent quand 
ils ont dix-sept ou dix-huit ans, comme 
ici. Nous avons deux batiments: le 
batiment ancien s'eleve ou la mairie 
s'elevait audouziemeet treizieme siecles, 
et le batiment nouveau, qui contient les 
laboratoires et quelques salles de classes. 
La grande salle aussi est dans ce bati- 
ment, et la nous avons un petit service 
chaque matin, et aussi des spectacles de 
Shakespeare et toutes les fonctions de 
l'ecole. 

Nous portons un uniforme, les filles 
portent une tunique bleue, une blouse 
blanche, et une cravate. Les garcons 
portent un habit bleu, des pantalons 
gris et une cravate. L'ete, les filles et 



les garcons de la sixieme forme, de dix- 
sept ans portent des chapeaux de paille, 
et si les filles les portent dans une autre 
ville ou on ne nous connait pas, les gens 
nous regardent avec curiosite et nous 
ne l'aimons pas. Nous portons une 
jaquette rayee en ete aussi. 

II y a quatre "maisons" a l'ecole qui 
sont nominees apres les saints protec- 
tees des lies brittaniques, et toutes les 
notes que nous obtenons pendant 1' an- 
nee sont additionnees au bout de 
l'annee, et la maison avec la plupart des 
notes gagnent un bouclier d'argent 
pour la duree de l'annee prochaine. 
Chaque maison essaie de garder ce 
trophee parce qu'il est le plus haut prix 
qu'une maison puisse obtenir. II y a 
plusieurs autres trophees pour gagner, 
les gobelets pour les jeux, pour nager, 
pour le jeu de crosse, pour le football, 
pour le criquet, et deux autres pour 
Victor Ludorum et Victoria Ludorum. 
Ces prix sont pour le gargon et la fille 
qui obtiennent les meilleures notes pour 
sa maison le jour des jeux. 

Nous avons de beaux jar dins autour 
de l'ecole, qui sont nommes "Les Cedres", 
et naturellement. il y a des cedres 
dans le jardin. Nous avons aussi une 
piscine et deux jeux de paumes. Pres de 
1' ecole nous avons un beau champ de 
jeu, et il est un des meilleurs pour 
plusieurs milles autour de nous. Nous 
sommes fieres le notre ecole et du champ. 
Pamela Damment '41 



QUAND J'ETAIS PETITE 
Quand j'etais petite, j'avais mes 

poupees, 
Des cheveux roux, de beaux yeux bleus. 
J'avais de petits plats, meme des choses 

a manger. 
J'etais la mere, le pere, le maitre, dans 

mes jeux. 
Quand mes petites, malades, et desha- 

billees 
Etaient dans leurs lits, moi, j'etais le 

docteur ! 
Quand j'etais petite, meme que j'ai 

pleure, 
Malgre mes malheurs, j'ai grandi sans 

douleurs. 

Maraha V ickery '41 

LE PRISONNIER 

Le juge — au prisonnier — "On vous a 
trouve coupable de votre crime. Com- 
ment preferez-vous mourir?" 

Le prisonnier — "Monsieur le juge, je 
prefere mourir de vieillesse, s'il vous 
plait." 

Francis Dretler '41 



Page U7 



UNE FAUTE 

Le premier jour de l'ecole un pro- 
fesseur a dit a sa clas&e d' anglais, "Si 
je fais des fautes pendant l'annee, cor- 
rigez-moi. N'ayez pas peur." 

Un jour le professeur a fait une 
faute. Maintenant il y avait dans cette 
classe un garcon qui etait tres intelli- 
gent mais trop timide. II a remarque 
tout de suite la faute du professeur mais 
il etait si timide qu'il avait peur de le 
corriger. 

II avait dans sa poche un petit dic- 
tionnaire. II l'a pris, et il a cherche le 
mot que le professeur n'avait pas bien 
employe. Apres beaucoup d'hesitation il 
a leve la main. 

"Qu'est-ce que vous voulez?" de- 
manda le professeur. 

"Monsieur, le professeur," il a re- 
pondu, "le dictionnaire a tort." 

Laura Paoletti '41 



LATIN 



LE RENARD ET LES RAISINS 

Maitre Renard allait tres, tres vite chez 

lui, 
En se disant a lui-meme : "J'ai tres f aim 

aujourd'hui." 
Aussitot il s'est apercu des raisins 
Sur une vigne pres d'un gros arbre en 

chemin ; 
Alors, le Renard allait au galop de joie 
A travers l'herbe et a cote du bord des 

bois. 
Mais, les jolis raisins etaient lointains 

et hauts. 
Aussi, Maitre Renard avait un grand 

defaut. 
II ne pouvait pas atteindre sa belle 

proie. 
Done, le Renard s'est dit a lui-meme a 

haute voix : 
"Peut-etre ees raisins sont trop verts et 

maigres. 
Qui sait? Ces raisins probablement sont 
aigres." 

IDORE BENATI '41 



LE PERE — LE FILS 
En colere le pere d'un petit garcon 
qui venait de faire mal a sa jeune fille, 
etait completement fatigue parce qu'il 
avait fouette son fils. II lui a dit, "Ah, 
que je suis fatigue." 

Son fils a repondu, "Oui, mais au 
moins vous pouvez vous asseoir pour 
vous reposer." 

George Doten '41 

Page 48 



ALL LATIN TEAM 

Fullback — Julius Caesar — 

Was responsible for an undefeated 
season on the "Roman Warriors" 
team. 

Left Halfback — Mercury — 
A fine, broken-field runner. 

Right Halfback — Aeneas — 

Led Trojan followers despite inter- 
ference. 

Quarterback — Cicero — 

Called all the plays against Catiline. 

Right End— Paris- 
Snatched Helen on the run. 

Right Tackle — Hercules — 
Never fumbled his tasks. 

Right Guard — Cerberus — 

Guarded entrance to lower world. 

Center — Achates — 

Supported Aeneas in all his plans and 
enterprises. 

Left Guard — Achilles — 

Led interference against Trojans. 

Left Tackle— Brutus- 
Tackled the job of killing Caesar. 

Left End — Ulysses — 
Used sleeper play on the Trojans. 

Coach — Jupiter — 
Instructed the Gods. 

George Doten '41 



SONG REVIEW 

'So You're the One" — 

Miss Wilber 
'You've Got Me This Way"— 

Cicero 
'There'll Be Some Changes Made"— 

Latin Mark 
T Hear a Rhapsody" — 

When someone else recites 
'Same Old Story"— 

Cicero's Orations 
'Practice Makes Perfect" — 

Translating Latin 
'High on a Windy Hill"— 

My mind in Latin period 
'Deep in a Dream" — 

Latin homelesson 
'I'll Never Smile Again" — 

'Til this is translated 
'We Three"— 

Cicero, midnight, and I 
'My Prayer"— 

Before Latin examination 
'Darn that Dream" — 

A-)- in Latin 
'Goody, Good-bye" — 

Cicero in June. 

Phyllis Diegoli '42 



HISTORY REPEATS ITSELF? 




TEUCRI- TROJANS 
DANM- CREEKS 

A GAME FOR ALL AMERICANS 

Do you consider yourself a patriot? 
Do you know The American's Creed? 
Why not check on yourself by filling in 
the blanks below? Each blank repre- 
sents a Latin derivative which has been 
omitted. 

Don't look for the answers until 
you've finished. You can then find them 
on page 50. 

I believe in the 

of America as a government of the 

, by the , for the 

; whose powers 

are from the 

of the governed; a democracy in a 

;a 

of many 

j a , 

and , estab- 
lished upon those of 

freedom, , , 

and , for which American 

their 

lives and 

I therefore believe it my duty to my 

country to love it, to its 

, to obey its laws, 

to its flag, and to 

it against all enemies. 

William Tyler Page 
Faith Millman '42 



IbORl BENATI 

SCHOOL SONG 

Ave tibi ! Plymouthio Alto 

Diu, diu stes ! 

Firmae sint tuae virtutes ut 

Illius Pilgrimi manus; 

Nostra optima tibi faciemus, 

Diem ex die 

Nitentes ad firma bona 

Omnibus quae putemus, faciamus aut 

dicamus. 
Amata alma Mater, cara, 
Tibi canimus! 

Tuas laudes semper sonabimus 
Caelum resonare cogentes ; 
Horarum numquam obliviscamur 
Quas tecum sumpsimus. 
Et tuam gloriam praedicabimus 
Cotidie et quaque hora iterum. 

Roger Whiting '42 



LATIN 

The "L" means more than "labor," 

And "a" means "amarus," 

"T" stands for such "tormentum", 

And "i" for "indoctus". 

Then for a fitting ending, 

I'm sure you'll all agree 

That "n" refers to "neco", 

What Latin does to me ! 

Connie Murray '42 

Page lf.9 



THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

I believe in the United States of 
America as a government of the people, 
by the people, and for the people ; whose 
just powers are derived from the con- 
sent of the governed ; a democracy in a 
Republic; a sovereign Nation of many 
sovereign states ; a perfect Union, one 
and inseparable, established upon those 
principles of freedom, equality, justice, 
and humanity, for which American 
patriots sacrificed their lives and for- 
tunes. 

I therefore believe it my duty to my 
country to love it, to support its Consti- 
tution, to obey its laws, to respect its 
flag, and to defend it against all enemies. 
William Tyler Page 



SOLUS RANGERUS 

Erat olim nobilissimus vir nomine 
Solus Rangerus. Magnum equum nom- 
ine Silverum habuit, qui magnitudine 
et celeritate superavit. Eius socius erat 
Tontus, acer Indianus, qui vestigia 
cuiusquam perfacile sequi poterat. 

Solus Rangerus et Tontus malos viros 
non amaverunt, atque eos interf ecerunt 
ut patriam tutam facerent. 

Ubi malum virum viderunt, Solus 
Rangerus clamabat "Hi ! ! Silvere" ; et 
magnus equus contendit ut malum virum 
superaret. Turn Solus Rangerus arma 
excipit, et "Bang, Bang" et malus vir 
moritur. Dictum est, Solum Rangerum 
una manu Iasonen interficere potuisse, 
quod fortissimus et acerrimus erat. 

Viri semper nomen, Solum Rangerum, 
memoria tenebunt. 

Richard Kearsley '43 



7 



1. form of preposition "out of" 

2. a common conjunction 

3. a suffix for emphasis 

4. abl. of a noun meaning "fear" 

MY REPORT CARD 

I get "A+" in English, 
"B+" in Chemistry— 
Another one in Algebra, 
The Honor Roll I see. 
But then I come to Latin, 
I look, and "Woe is me !" 
The Honor Roll retreats 
Before my bright red "C." 

Connie Murray '42 
Page §0 





1 












X 












3 














H 














s 
















6 





























weapon 



5. nom. of a noun meaning 

6. supine in um of "effero" 

7. an obsolete trans, of "invideo" 

Anne Richards '42 

ALUMNI CENSUS 





'38 GIRLS 


'39 GIRLS 


'40 GIRLS 


Working 


27 


45 


41 


Married 


6 


11 


2 


At Home 


5 


7 


6 


At School 


14 


28 


16 




'38 BOYS 


'39 BOYS 


'40 BOYS 


Working 


46 


36 


39 


Enlisted 


4 


4 


5 


At Home 


2 


2 


3 


At School 


14 


19 


21 




ACTIVITIES 





CHEER LEADERS 

John Gascoyne, Agnes Emond, Robert Drew, Barbara Viets, and George Canucci 



Plymouth — 

April 15 and 16, 1941 

The opera "Martha", 
by Von Flotow, was 
very beautifully pre- 
sented by students of 
the Plymouth Senior 
High School. With 
Walter Corrow as the 
gentle and sincere 
Lionel, William Lamborghini as the 
amusing and boisterous Plunket, Faith 




Millman as the sweet and shy Martha, 
Marjorie Neal as the happy Nancy, 
Allan Burgess as the stern Sheriff of 
Richmond, and Loring Belcher with his 
highly amusing interpretation of the 
blundering Tristan, the principals 
proved to be well cast. 

Generous credit belongs to the pupils 
and teachers who worked on ticket sales, 
properties, costumes, and stage settings, 
but it was the fine cooperation of all con- 
cerned in this production which made it 
a finished and colorful performance. 




PRINCIPALS IN THE OPERETTA "MARTHA" 

Faith Millman as Lady Harriet. Walter Corrow as Lionel, Allan Burgess as the Sheriff 
of Richmond, Loring Belcher as Tristan of Mickleford, William Lamborghini as Plunket, 
and Marjorie Neal as Nancy 



Page 52 




STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 
Front Row: Miss Rafter, Walter Corrow, George Doten, Joan Holmes, Agnes Emond, 

Betty Whiting, George Shea, Idore Benati, Mary Creati, Laura Paoletti, Frances 

Barlow, Harold De Carli, Robert Wilson, and Miss Wilber 
Second Row: Mr. Pyle, Joan Gardner, Dorothy Morton, Melquezideque Perry, Roger 

Whiting, Theodore Lodi, Paul Brewster, Elenore Hall, Ruth Pederzani, and Miss Lang 
Third Row: Frederick Wirzburger, Benjamin Brewster, Joseph Lamborghini, David 

Hamilton, Richard Kearsley, Dean Stevens, Edwin Bastoni, Joseph Tavernelli, Alvin 

Montanari, George Radcliffe, and William Lamborghini 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY At the business meeting Miss Alice G. 

Teacher Sponsor Langford, National Secretary, related 

Miss Amy Rafter an interesting and amusing account of 

_, , , „_„„ nn , T , the journey to the Milwaukee Conven- 

Founded 1933 36 Members tion 

_ . 7 , Officers Joseph Lamborghini was chosen vice- 

President Idore Benati pres ident of the Society because the 

Vice-President Theodore Martin former vice _p r e S ident had moved from 

Secretary George Shea t ^ e district 

Purpose « The Tantrum „ a one _ act comedy 

The purpose of " tne S 1. A. S., an orga- cached by Miss Dorris Moore, was 

mzation representing the entire student presented by members of our Dramatic 

body of the Plymoutn High School, is to Club after the busini8ss mee ting had 

encourage and coordinate activities both been adjourned 

new and old within the school. The banking' system, which was or- 

Activities ganized in 1939 under the supervision of 

The S. A. S. has been particularly am- Miss Elizabeth Kelly, a member of the 

bitious this year in the numerous pro- Commercial Department, has operated 

jects it has undertaken. First, it was successfully throughout the year. By 

host to various schools in the South- depositing regularly each Wednesday 

eastern Branch of Associated Body of morning, students learn the value of 

Student Councils, which met at Plym- thrift. 

outh High School on October 30, 1940. The proceeds from the Operetta 

Mr. Stacey B. Southworth, headmaster "Martha," which, through the courtesy 

at Thayer Academy, addressed the of the music department, was the 

afternoon session on "Pilgrims of To- S. A. S. money-making project for the 

day, The American Youth." During his year, were divided among the major or- 

speech, Mr. Southworth read two inter- ganizations of the school, 

esting and timely documents: one, a As has been the custom in the past 

speech delivered by Hitler at Nuremberg the S. A. S. assumed responsibility for 

to the children of Germany ; the other, the appeal for Jordan Hospital dona- 

a speech by the former prime minister tions at Thanksgiving time. Miss Mar- 

of England to the children of that jorie Wilber sponsored this very suc- 

country. cessful undertaking. 

Page 53 



This year the Christmas Seal Drive, 
which has been an annual affair at the 
Plymouth High School since 1938, was 
supervised by Miss Amy Rafter. Each 
year the total amount of money col- 
lected has steadily increased. This year 
a graph was made to show the number 
of seals bought by each class. Joseph 
Lamborghini was General Manager, 
assisted by three general floor man- 
agers. Each home room had a represen- 
tative in charge of sales. 

Each year the S. A. S. sponsors a va- 
riety of assembly programs. This year 
Mrs. Aloha Baker, "The World's Most 
Travelled Woman," entertained the 
student body with a motion picture and 
a travel talk about the Far East. A lively 
question period followed. Another pro- 
gram featured the "Great Bruce," a 
magician, whose excursion into the 



realm of mystery entertained and mysti- 
fied his audience. 

The W. P. A. Band from Brockton 
played at the Washington and Lincoln 
assembly under the auspices of the 
S. A. S. The program was enthusias- 
tically received. 

The cheer leaders, under the leader- 
ship of Mr. Carlo Guidaboni, have been 
active at the football and basketball 
games this year. 

In December the S. A. S. sponsored a 
membership drive for the Junior Red 
Cross, under the supervision of Mr. 
Arthur Pyle. Alvin Montanari, the 
General Chairman, was assisted by rep- 
resentatives in every home room. A 
sufficient amount of money was collected 
to enable each home room to become a 
member of the Junior Red Cross. 




PRESS CLUB 
Front Row: Richard Gavone, Joseph Bergamini, Marjorie Neal, Ruth Pederzani, Ruth 

Tavares, and David Brings 
Second Row: Miss Moore, Helen Arnold, Florinda Leal, Barbara Fish, Harold Hayward, 

Doris Rogan, Evelyn Ryerson, George Canucci, and Muriel Humphrey 



JUNIOR PRESS CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor 

Miss Dorris Moore 

Founded 1929 13 Members 

Purpose 
The Junior Press Club is a small or- 
ganization of writers trained to report 
to the local papers on the activities of 
the school. Membership is determined 
by submission of suitable editorial 
material in open competition at the end 
of the sophomore year. 

Instead of officers this club has ed- 
itors — Editor-in-chief — Richard Ga- 
vone; S. A. S. Editor — Ruth Pederzani; 

Page 54 



Sports — Florinda Leal and Harold Hay- 
ward; Science — Joseph Bergamini; 
Scrapbook — David Briggs; "The Pil- 
grim" — George Canucci ; Arts and 
Crafts — Evelyn Ryerson; Home Eco- 
nomics and Social Benefits — Doris 
Rogan and Barbara Fish ; Latin Club — 
Muriel Humphrey, and Assemblies — 
Helen Arnold. 

Members bring news to each meeting 
and discuss material for publication in 
the "New Bedford Times", "The Old 
Colony Memorial", "The Brockton En- 
terprise", and the "Plymouth News 
Digest". 




DRAMATIC CLUB 
Front Row: Shirley Hanson, Helen Sherman, Laura Resnick, Shirley Collins, Muriel 

Humphrey, Barbara Fish, and Mar.jorie Neal 
Second Row: Barbara Wood, Patrice Dowd, Pauline Gilbert, Anne Donovan, Miss Moore, 

Gladys Cohen, Barbara Jones, Doris Bergonzini, and Marcia Brooks 
Third Row: Harold Hayward, George Carter, Albert Hatton, Robert Post, Robert Cook, 

and George Canucci 



DRAMATIC CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor 
Miss Dorris Moore 
Founded 1940 22 Members 

The Dramatic Club is a newly-organ- 
ized club sponsored for the pupils inter- 
ested in play production. This group 
presented a one-act comedy, "The Tan- 
trum", before the student body and the 



S. A. S. Convention. The play was en- 
thusiastically received on both occa- 
sions. 

Several of the club members had 
leading roles in the operetta "Martha", 
and several more took part in "Glad 
Tidings from Dark Days," a patriotic 
program in song and story presented by 
Plymouth High School students before 
the Plymouth Woman's Club. 




A scene from "Glad Tidings from Dark Days," presented before the Plymouth Woman's 
Club by the Plymouth High School 

Page 



55 




NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 
Front Row: Laura Resnick, Laura Paoletti, Dorris Bliss, Betty Whiting, Walter Corrow, 

Mary Creati, Dorothy Morton, Frances Johnson, and Faith Millman 
Second Row: Mr. Guidaboni, Marian Radcliffe, Jeanette Franks, Lydia Mongan, Anne 

Donovan, Evon Briggs, Anna Scotti, Doris Bernardoni, and Mr. Romano 
Third Row: George Doten, Robert Wilson, Idore Benati, Richard Wirtzburger, Joseph 

Lamborghini, Alvin Montanari, Harold De Carli, and George Canucci 

THF NTATTONTAT Then, too, the society has assumed the 

li-ifc INAllUiNAL responsibility of gathering information 

HONOR SOCIETY on the activities of its former members. 

Teacher Sponsors On March 31, April Fool's Eve, an in- 

Mr. Mario Romano formal initiation was held in Room 106 

Mr. Carlo Guidaboni with all members present. After the 

Founded 1929 25 Members newly-elected members had been duly 

President Walter Corrow initiated into the society, refreshments 

Vice-President Betty Whiting W€re served. 

Secretary MARY CREATI The last three meetings of the society 

The members of this society are were of a business and social nature, 
chosen on a class percentage basis by The socials were in charge of three 
vote of the faculty. In February of this groups — the newly-elected Juniors, the 
year twelve per cent of the Junior class Seniors, and the society officers, 
were elected, while another five per Once again the National Honor So- 
cent of the Seniors become eligible in ciety sponsored the senior Get-To- 
June. A student must be in the upper gethers. Music was furnished by a 
fourth of his class to be considered for recording machine and also by a school- 
membership in the society, but scho- boy orchestra. 

lastic standing plays only a part in the The last activity of the year was a 

selection of this group. A student must picnic held in June, 

also be a good leader, possess a fine ~* ~* "~" 
moral character, and participate in 

school activities. Membership in this Best Wishes 
organization bestows the highest honor 
that can be given to a student in the 

school. LEONORE'S BEAUTY SALON 
Activities 

This year the society continued the 

work commenced two years ago— the RPnrroT rs marktpt 

maintainence of a large college cata- dkullvjli a tvi/\Krvti i 
logue library in the high school office. 

The library should be of great service Purveyors or rme hoods 

to those students planning to enter col- 

] ege Tel. Plymouth 837 

Page 56 




BANKERS 
Front Row: Joseph Giovanetti, Arthur Amaral, Theodore Lodi, George Shea, Alvin 

Montanari, Frederick Wirzburger, and Allan Burgess 
Second Row: Edmund Axford, Richard Gavone, Richard Wirtzburger, Arthur Moskos, 

John Nutterville, and Ruez Gallerani 




GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

Front Row: Barbara Viets, Harriet Bassett, Mex'cy Kellen, Shirley Collins, Anna Jesse, 
Caroline Barufaldi, Teresa De Trani, Mary Capozucca, Olive Harlow, Charlotte 
Valler, Frances Nutterville, Faith Milknan, Elizabeth Heath, Muriel Humphrey, and 
Lois Jesse 

Second Row: Ruth Pederzani, Dorothy Morton, Laura Resnick, Anna Borghesani, Laura 
Sylvia, Marie Shimmelbush, Gladys Cohen, Jean Boutin, Naomi McNeil, Marion Finney, 
Miss Hunt, Doris Bernardoni, Doris Bergonzini, Joan Gardner, Pearl Vitti, Phyllis 
Diegoli, Isabel Hunt, Priscilla Crawley, Pamela Damment, Julia Schneider, Grace 
Lacey, and Evelyn Ryerson 

Third Row: Barbara Fish, Elspeth Sloane, Jeanette Franks, Helen Sherman, Mary 
Anderson, Jane Reynolds, Anne Richards, Leona Vannah, Martha Vickery, Evelyn 
Boyle, Helene Longhi, Anne Donovan, Phyllis Lawuay, Marylew Haire, Marjorie Neal, 
Mary Kennedy, Betty Curtin, Pauline Leonardi, Marian Radcliffe. Dorothy Phelan, 
Helen Whiting, Barbara Jones, and Helen Arnold 

Page 57 




SCIENCE CLUB 
Front Row: Joseph Sylvia, Malcolm Chamberlain, Donald Parsons, Erring-ton Brown, 

Norman Longhi, George Carter, George Doten, Joseph Bergamini, and Alfred Holmes 
Second Row: Raymond Bibeau, William Winter, Joseph Fratus, Roderick Magee, George 

Holmes, Bernard Kirtzmacher, Arthur Tache, Richard Po. Walter Silva, Allen Longhi, 

and Mr. Packard 
Third Row: Albert Pillsbury, Robert Cook, Wesley Nickerson, John Demaine, John 

Cadorette, William Lamborghini, Harold Hayward, and Samuel Franc 



SCIENCE CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor 

Mr. John W. Packard 

Founded 1935 25 Members 

President Norman Longhi 

Vice-President Errington Brown 

(Aviation) 

Vice-President George Carter 

(Radio) 
Secretary-Treasurer Donald Parsons 
Once a week the Scienca Club con- 
venes in Room 102. After a short busi- 
ness meeting, a discussion period fol- 
lows, at which time a lecture is delivered 
by Mr. Packard or by one of the club 
members. On several occasions an out- 
ride speaker has addressed the group, or 
motion picture films have been shown. 
Through the courtesy of the New 



England Telephone Company, the mem- 
bers of the club visited Radio Station 
WOU at Green Harbor. The engineer 
in charge, Mr. Steele, explained the de- 
tails of the operations of the shortwave 
radio telephone transmitters and re- 
ceivers. He also discussed with the or- 
ganization the advantages of member- 
ship in the Naval Communication 
Reserve. 

The club members have been trained 
in the operation of the shortwave radio 
receiver and phonograph amplifier, and 
on request have set up and operated the 
equipment for the teachers in the class- 
rooms or auditorium. 

During the year, members learned 
radio code signals, and several boys have 
built airplane models. 

Further plans include field trips to 
study airplanes and airport facilities. 



FRANKLIN AUTO SUPPLY 



We hope that you will do unto 
Our Advertisers as they have done 
by us. 



Page 58 




BAND 
Front Row: Jane Reynolds, Charlotte Valler, Betty Curtin, and Patricia Douglass 
Second Row: Joseph Kaiser, Wallace MacLean, Tony Costa, Mr. Pacheco, John Kelley, 

Donald Mayers, Roderick Magee, and Errington Brown 
Third Row: Thcmas Brewer, Francis Stas, John Souza, Manuel Silva, Tony Soares, 

Louis Sitta, and Donald Douglas 
Fourth Row: Loring Belcher, Edwin Bastoni. Herbert Costa, Charles Stasinos, Harold 

De Carli, Walter St. George, and Howard Haire 




BOYS' GLEE CLUB 
Front Row: Errington Brown, Evan Yates, Albert Hatton, Miss Hunt, George Carter, 

Norman Longhi, and Walter Corrow 
Second Row: Alfred Holmes, Wesley Nickerson, Raymond Bibeau, George Doten, 

Edward Penn, and Norman Gifford 
Third Row: John Ragonetti, Donald Parsons, Edward Rioux, Edward Cavicchi, Edwin 

Baker, and Allan Burgess 



Page 59 




LATIN CLUB 

Roger Whiting, Barbara Jones, Miss Wilber, and Richard Kearsley 



LATIN CLUB 

Teacher Sponsor 

Miss Marjorie Wilber 

Founded 1938 30 Members 

Officers 

President Roger Whiting 

Vice-President Richard Kearsley 

Secretary-Treasurer Barbara Jones 



Activities 

The Latin Club, which meets once a 
month at the school or at a member's 
home, was organized for pupils keenly 
interested in the study of Latin. 

The Hollywood Dance, which was 
sponsored by the Latin and Art Clubs, 
was a very successful affair. Cash 
prizes were awarded for the best im- 
personations of Hollywood stars. 




GIRLS' SEXTET 
Front Row: Anna Jesse, Dorothy Morton, and Mercy Kellen 

Second Row: Faith Millman, Doris Bergonzini, Mai-jorie Neal, Martha Vickery, and 
Helen Whiting 



Page 60 




RED CROSS GROUP 

Mary Bonzagni, Miss Boucher, Florence Smith, Dorothy Costa, Thelma Karle, Althea 
Malaguti, Lois Jesse, Shirley Thomas, Marjorie Cadose, Eva Creati, and Dorothy 
Schneider 



VOCATIONAL RED CROSS 

Teacher Sponsor 
Miss Viola Boucher 
Founded 1941 11 Members 

This year a Red Cross group was or- 
ganized at the Plymouth High School 
under the leadership of Miss Viola 
Boucher, head of the Vocational Arts 
Department. Eleven sophomore girls in 



Vocational Arts Classes made thirty 
layettes for the British Relief. 

In the spring a Red Cross Knitting 
Club was organized by the Dean of Girls, 
Mrs. Miriam Raymond. Helen Whiting 
served as captain of the senior unit; 
Joan Holmes led the juniors; Betty 
Curtin, the sophomores. Approximately 
sixty girls made shawls, scarfs, beanies, 
sweaters, and mittens. 




ORCHESTRA 
Front Row: George Doten, Alfred Holmes, Martha Vickery, Mr. Pacheco, Dorothy Bagni, 

Anna Borghesani, Mercy Kellen, and Frances Johnson 
Second Row: George Jesse, Edmund Gianferrari, Wesley Nickerson, Evan Yates, Donald 

Parsons, Philip Manchester, and Melquezideque Perry 
Third Row: Loring Belcher, Howard Haire, John Kelley, Wallace MacLean, Errington 
Brown, Charles Stasinos, and Walter St. George 

Page 



61 



THE MUSICOLUMN 




Plymouth — September, 1940 

Six girls formed a musical sextet to- 
day because of the enjoyment they get 
from ensemble singing. The group con- 
sists of: sopranos — Faith Millman and 
Marjorie Neal ; second sopranos — Mercy 
Kellen and Martha Vickery ; and altos — 
Helen Whiting and Doris Bergonzini. 
The sextet has already received several 
invitations, and is looking forward to a 
very successful year. 

Plymouth — October 8, 1940 

The Women's Civic Association was 
entertained by the Girls' Sextet this 
evening at a meeting which was held at 
the Plymouth Rock House. An alumni 
trio consisting of Melquezideque Perry, 
Robert Tedeschi, and Umberto Stanghel- 
lini, also entertained. The program 
received many generous compliments. 

Plymouth — Any Saturday 

The Plymouth High 
School Band has been 
doing its part in a big 
way at the local foot- 
ball games these Satur- 
day afternoons. Their 
colorful uniforms add 
much to the atmos- 
phere of the games. For that matter, so 
does their music, which is under the 
careful leadership of Mr. John Pacheco. 
Plymouth — November 11, 1940 

The sextet entertained at The Wom- 
en's Alliance of the First Church this 
afternoon. The performance was highly 
praised, and a very kind letter was sent 
to Miss Beatrice Hunt, their musical 
advisor. 

Plymouth — November 28, 1940 

The Boys' and Girls' Glee Clubs com- 
bined to offer music for the very impres- 
sive Thanksgiving pageant this after- 
noon in the Memorial Hall. Also parti- 
cipating in the affair were the Plymouth 
Women's Glee Club and Men's Glee Club. 
All music was under the direction of 
Miss Beatrice Hunt. 
Plymouth — December 18, 1940 

A very joyful and 
timely program was 
presented by the Boys' 
and Girls' Glee Clubs 
this afternoon for the 
enjoyment of Christ- 
mas shoppers. It con- 
sisted mainly of Christ- 
mas carols, but part of the program was 
devoted to numbers played by Mr. 

Page 62 




John Pacheco and some members of the 
High School Band. 

Plymouth — December 20, 1940 

A Christmas assembly was presented 
here today by the Reverend Mr. Alfred 
R. Hussey. After selections from 
Dickens' "Christmas Carol", the com- 
bined Glee Clubs joined the student body 
in the singing of carols. 

Plymouth — February 1, 1941 

The "In And About Boston Music 
Educators' Association" was entertained 
by the sextet at the University Club. 
The girls were in their usual good form, 
and many compliments were received 
from those members present. The 
sextet as of this date consists of: 
sopranos — Faith Millman and Marjorie 
Neal; second sopranos — Martha Vick- 
ery and Anna Jesse ; altos Helen Whiting 
and Doris Bergonzini. Anna Jesse is sub- 
stituting for Mercy Kellen because of 
illness. 

Plymouth — February 5, 1941 

The Plymouth High School Orchestra 
and combined Glee Clubs furnished 
music for the Plymouth Woman's Club 
Education Afternoon. 
Plymouth — March 5, 1941 

The Plymouth High 
School Orchestra pre- 
sented a short concert 
for the Plymouth 
Woman's Club at the 
High School this after- 
noon. The orchestra 
played several numbers 
before the very amusing play, "Neigh- 
bors" by Zona Gale. To introduce the 
play, Melquezideque Perry played a few 
strains of "Home Sweet Home." 

Plymouth — March 12, 1941 

The sextet, accompanied by Miss Bea- 
trice Hunt, attended the New London 
Festival of Music. They left Plymouth 
early in the morning and arrived at their 
destination in the early afternoon. 
Most of the five days were spent in 
hard practice with the many other mus- 
ical groups which attended the festival 
from many towns and cities all over the 
United States. They also had the oppor- 
tunity to visit the Coast Guard Station 
in New London. Saturday evening, 
March 15, the combined groups gave a 
very successful concert followed by a 
grand ball. Besides making many new 
friends, the sextet gained much through 
this musical experience. 




FOOTBALL ROUNDUP 

WITH the newly-appointed coach, Mr. 
John Walker, and assistant coach 
Romano at the helm, Plymouth High 
opened its 1940 season against Hingham 
and registered victory number one at 
the expense of the Trojans. The first 
victory was one of the seven piled up by 
Plymouth's gridiron stars. They suf- 
fered two setbacks, one of which was 
hard to lose. That was when Plymouth 
played in Abington and the two teams 
were deadlocked for the first half. How- 
ever, late in the third quarter Abington 
recovered a fumble on Plymouth's two- 
yard stripe. It was then only a matter 
of McPhelmy driving over his right 
guard for the touchdown. This was the 
only score of the game, and Abington 
finished on top by a 6 — count. 

Plymouth's grid stars on the follow- 
ing Saturday stopped Rockland's un- 
certain football machine by a 13 — 
count and registered victory number 
two. 

The next game played was that be- 
tween Plymouth and its newly-estab- 
lished football connection, Attleboro. 
Plymouth won this hard-fought game by 
a 13 — score. The two touchdowns 
came in the second and third periods as 
the result of passes. The first score, 
late in the second period, was the cul- 
mination of a 78 yard sustained drive, 
in which Plymouth in just four passes 
and four rushes reached pay dirt. 
Bernardo, Benati, and Strassel set up 
this touchdown with Bernardo and Ben- 
ati throwing them and Strassel on the 
receiving end. Silvio Adamo scored the 
second touchdown on a reverse play, 
taking the lateral from Captain Stevens 
in close formation. This came early in 
the third period after Bernardo had in- 
tercepted an Attleboro pass on the At- 
tleboro 28 yard line. Benati then threw 
a pass, Bernardo received it, and the 138 
pound back was downed on the Jeweler's 
three-yard stripe. Bernardo was hurt 
on the play, and was forced to leave the 
game. He was replaced by Adamo who 



went over for Plymouth's second touch- 
down after two more plays. 

On the following Saturday, Plymouth 
scored its fourth victory of the season 
by winning a victory over Bridgewater 
by a 14 — 7 score. Bernardo's passing 
and Benati's power driving were two 
reasons for the Plymouth scores. Ben- 
ati, in both instances, booted between 
the uprights with Bernardo holding. 
Bridgewater scored on a lateral to Dame 
on Bridgewater's 30 yard stripe and he 
raced 65 yards up the field, being 
downed just 5 yards short of a score. 
In the third period, a pass from Zion 
scored for the stubborn Bridgewater 
eleven. 

A doubtful Middleboro team went 
down fighting the next Saturday at 
Middleboro. The Orange and Black 
scored a touchdown in the third period 
to throw a scare into the Plymouth boys 
who had 12 points chalked up, but the 
game ended with Plymouth the victor 
12—6. 

In a downpour of rain the following 
week, Plymouth and Whitman fought 
their forty-sixth annual classic and 
Plymouth won its fifth straight victory 
from the Red and Black with Bernardo 
and Benati doing all the scoring to give 
Plymouth a 13 — win. 

Weymouth High's gridiron champs 
kept their slate clean when they invaded 
and completely dominated the play to 
defeat Plymouth 34—7. Cavallo, Del- 
orey, and Wheeler were the main scor- 
ing factors for Weymouth. Benati, not 
at all happy about the score, passed and 
rushed his way to Weymouth's four- 
yard line and then plunged over for 
Plymouth's lone touchdown. 

The final game of the season found 
Plymouth making good its chances to 
even the series with a newcomer, Barn- 
stable, by defeating the Cape Codders 
25 — 6 to end a successful grid season. 
Barnstable was stopped cold in the last 
two periods when Plymouth rolled up a 
score which gave Coaches Walker and 
Romano something to talk about. This 
game also climaxed the high school 
football career of Idore Benati, Adelino 

Page 63 



Bernardo, Martin McAuley, Harold 
Strassel, Edward Ribeiro, and Captain 
Dean Stevens, who graduate this year. 

PLYMOUTH HIGH SCHOOL 
FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR 1940 



Hingham — at Home 
Abington — Away 
Rockland — at Home 
Attleboro— at Home 
Bridgewater — at Home 
Middleboro — Away 
Whitman — Away 
Weymouth — at Home 
Barnstable — Away 



OPP. 


P. H. S. 





13 


6 








13 





13 


7 


14 


6 


12 





13 


34 


7 


6 


25 



A PASSING ATTACK 

piRST of all, a tribute to the second 

team. The varsity agrees that the 
subs provided stiff opposition during 
scrimmage practices. Teddy Martin, 
second-string quarterback, injured his 
leg during one of these sessions. 

The boys haven't forgiven the referee 
of the Middleboro game for the perfect 
block on Eddie Ribeiro who was chasing 
a Middleboro back who had completed 
a pass. The back scored a touchdown as 
Ribeiro, the only obstacle in his way, was 
taken out by the referee — unintention- 
ally, of course. 

At Nantucket where the Plymouth 
third-stringers were badly beaten by the 
powerful Nantucket varsity, the Bar- 
bieri brothers were so eager that, in the 
course of the game, the boys growled at 
their opposition. Ever since that game, 
the boys have been appropriately named 
the "Growler Brothers." 

When some player missed a pass or 
failed to carry out an assignment, Coach 
Walker usually cried, "Get a gun!" or 
"Shoot him!" 

When Coach Romano threw a bad 
pass, he explained, "Wait till I throw a 
few more. I haven't warmed up enough." 

One day Danny Sullivan fell right in- 
to a mud puddle as he was running out 
for a pass. Loring Belcher received a 
magnificent black eye during a second 
team game. When Bliss hit the tackling 
dummy, he recoiled beautifully. 

The boys on the squad, as well as the 
coaches, agree that they have had a fine 
time this season. All seniors regret they 
cannot play football next year, but wish 
next year's squad the best of luck. 

Idore Benati '41 

Page 6b 




Coach Walker, Capt. Stevens and Coach Romano 
GET THAT BALL 

ANOTHER year of basketball has 
passed, and the season of '40 — '41 is 
now a memory. However, the players 
will not easily forget some of the games 
played. Although the hoop team of 
P. H. S. lost six games, it also defeated 
eight teams to earn a percentage of .600, 
which is nothing to be ashamed of con- 
sidering the calibre of the teams that 
Plymouth High must compete against. 

To start the season, the Plymouth 
hoopsters journeyed to Abington, and 
before a capacity crowd drubbed last 
year's champions to the tune of 37 — 15. 
The Plymouth boys shared fairly equally 
in the scoring, but the speed of Captain 
Bernardo and the scoring of Arthur 
Pederzani, who caged six field goals 
that were magnificent, were outstand- 
ing. 

The second game at Hingham was a 
thriller from start to finish, but Plym- 
out High ended on the short end of a 
31 — 28 score. The game was decided in 
the last minute of play after Plvmouth 
had tied the score at 28—28. 

The third game at Rockland brought 
together two great rivals in basketball. 
Rockland High, previously rated as the 
best schoolboy team in the district, was 




FOOTBALL SQUAD 
Front Row: Murdock Christie, Arthur Ruozzi, Martin McAuley, Edward Ribeiro, George 

Butters, Arthur Moskos, Sidney Shwom, Albert Post, and Harold Strassel 
Second Row: Coach John Walker, Silvio Adamo, Harold Maccaferri, Dean Stevens, 

Idore Benati, Adelino Bernardo, and Mr. Mario Romano 



removed from its high perch when the 
Plymouth sharpshooters took a 36 — 33 
decision in a truly hard-fought game. 
The Rockland players went down glori- 
ously with every evidence of good sports- 
manship. Captain Bernardo played the 
greatest game of his high school career 
by caging 13 points and by setting up 
many plays. 

East Bridgewater invaded Plymouth 
the following Friday night and captured 
a 48 — 36 decision. East Bridgewater led 
all the way, although the last two periods 
were rather close until late in the fourth 
period. 

On the following Tuesday, Plymouth 
invaded East Bridgewater, but was re- 
pulsed to the tune of 27 — 18. This game 
also was decided in the last quarter. 
Captain Bernardo and Arthur Peder- 
zani scored 13 of the 18 points for the 
Plymouth cause. 

The night following the East Bridge- 
water tilt, Plymouth encountered a stub- 
born North Attleboro team, and, after a 
rough encounter which put Adelino 
Bernardo and Vito Brigida on the bench 
on fouls, Plymouth registered a one- 
point triumph, 30 — 29. 

Behind the shooting of Pederzani and 
Bernardo, Plymouth made it victory 
number five at the expense of a fast- 
breaking Middleboro team, the final 
score being 35 — 20. 

The work of Wilbert Cingolani and 
Arthur Pederzani helped bring Plym- 
outh victory number six when they 



scored 29 points against a hard-fighting 
Bridgewater outfit. 

This same Bridgewater team revenged 
itself by walking over Plymouth on its 
home floor by a 44 — 29 score. This game 
was closely contested at the half, with 
the Plymouth lads having a slender 21 — 
20 lead. 

The following Friday North Attle- 
boro traveled to Plymouth, only to go 
back disappointed at a 35 — 23 setback. 

Then Plymouth High lost all the pep 
it possessed in the North Attleboro clash, 
and dropped a 35 — 27 thriller to Abing- 
ton. Again Bernardo and Pederzani 
caged 23 of the 27 points scored. 

The next game was eagerly awaited, 
for the Plymouth hoopsters were out to 
avenge the three-point defeat handed to 
them by Hingham for Plymouth's first 
setback. The contest was closely fought 
all the way, but Plymouth managed to 
hold on to a one-point lead to even the 
count with Hingham for the year. The 
final score was 39 — 38. 

Rockland made its Plymouth debut by 
copping a well-earned 38 — 32 victory 
from an in-and-out Plymouth basketball 
team. 

Plymouth High started off on the 
right foot in the Brockton Tournament 
by drubbing a slow-moving Randolph 
team, 48 — 27. In the semi-final tilt, 
Plymouth High encountered the heavily- 
favored Stoughton team. Stoughton, 
who was picked to wade through all op- 
position in Class "A", met a snag in the 

Page 65 




,171? ••*«■•' £«U gjgKBS 

hmw^ #■*?** ^"^* 





BOYS' BASKETBALL 
Front Row: Errington Brown, Manager, Gerald Romano, Adelino Bernardo, Peter 

Brigida, and Coach John Walker 
Second Row: Wilbert Cingolani, Bernard Lexner, Richard Wirtzburger, and Vito Brigida. 
Third Row: Arthur Pederzani, Dean Stevens, and Idore Benati 



Plymouth crew and, after a hard-fought, 
nip and tuck affair, emerged the winner 
by a one-point margin in the overtime 
period — the final score being 42 — 41. 
Captain Bernardo and Arthur Pederzani 
displayed their usual good form and 
scored 37 of the 41 points for Plymouth. 
MacKay, for Stoughton, put in the last 
and game-winning basket for the smooth- 
playing Stoughton team after Plymouth 
had become the apparent winner with 
only 17 seconds left to play. And with 
this resume, the curtain falls on another 
basketball season at Plymouth High 
School. 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 


Alumni at Plymouth 


56 


29 


Abington at Abington 


37 


15 


Hingham at Hingham 


28 


31 


Rockland at Rockland 


36 


33 


East Bridgewater 






at Plymouth 


30 


48 


East Bridgewater 






at East Bridgewater 


18 


27 


No. Attleboro 






at No. Attleboro 


30 


29 


Middleboro at Plymouth 


35 


20 


Bridgewater at Plymouth 


39 


33 


No. Attleboro at Plymouth 35 


23 


Abington at Plymouth 


27 


35 


Hingham at Plymouth 


39 


38 


Rockland at Plymouth 


32 


38 


Plymouth at Bridgewater 


29 


44 



SOPHOMORE SAGA 

We're the class that's hard to beat 

On gridiron, quiz, or in the street; 
We may not pass on every test, 

Yet we're still up there with the rest. 
In P. H. S. we all excel, 

And we don't lag upon the bell ; 
Down corridor we madly tear, 

You see for speed we have a flair. 
In sports, you say, there's been small 
cheer 

For any sophomore yet this year, 
But just you wait a little while 

And we'll be best in any trial. 
Our leader is a noble man 

By name of William Jackson Lam — 
To him and his we do accord 

The job of representing Ford. 
Kearsley comes from Manomet, 

And he's our good vice-president : 
He owns a car — nine years it's run, 

Like all old Fords, its time is done. 
Our secretary played the 'cello, 

Its tones were far from sweet and 
mellow — 
But now o'er keyboard "Jonesie" roams 

Evoking even weirder tones. 
Now at our till is Bouncing Ben, 

For surplus coin he has a yen — 
Although our books he'd gladly run, 

Our assets now are just plain none. 
In summing up you can't deny 

We sophomores hit an all-time high: 
Also by now you all must see 

This so-called poem's a fallacy. 

— By Two Sophomores 



Page 66 




Marion T^JdiPfc 



*,k 





Helen Uhrlme - 6oak< 




VltLD 



|\€CKCY 









Joan Gainer 
~RgH HalSWK 



Center Hatfksck 




"Alba "Pasolrni 
Left Halfbod( 




EJnn "nsumorxi 



MgW "lr>s\cl« 



"Dorotrw Morton 
Center FotujotJ 
Captain 





u»una "PaeAetti 
l-ef> XrviKJe 




tlarthaL^rnius 

Pae/e 67 



BULLY! BULLY! 

W/ITH a clash of sticks and at the ex- 
pense of many bruised shins, the 
girls of Plymouth High ushered in a new 
field hockey season in which there were 
many thrilling games frequently ending 
in ties. This year the team was com- 
posed entirely of seniors, who had 
worked patiently through their high 
school years toward the time when they 
would be worthy of a place on the team. 

One of the most important positions 
on the the team is that of goal tender, 
for she must assume the responsibility 
of saving the team from any error on the 
part of the defense. To Helen Whiting 
goes the credit for developing into one 
of the finest players in that position. For 
that matter, all the girls filled their 
positions gallantly and effectively, for at 
the close of the season they had experi- 
enced defeat only twice. 

The games were exciting and hard- 
fought, particularly those which were 
played with Scituate and Middleboro, 
who admittedly had very good teams this 
year. The team, led by a most efficient 
captain, Dorothy Morton, deserves 
praise for its good sportsmanship and 
spirit, even when defeat was imminent. 



It is interesting to note that Scituate 
had an undefeated, untied record until 
its team arrived in Plymouth for the 
second annual clash. It proved to be one 
of the most hard-fought games of the 
season, in which Plymouth marred its 
opponent's record by emerging with a 
tie score of one to one. 

By our coach, Mrs. Beatrice Garvin, 
the seniors will always be remembered 
as the famous "tie team", for it tied 
four of the seven games. However, the 
record shows that the season can be 
fairly described as successful. To the 
girls who will wear the blue tunics next 
October the girls of 1941 wish the best 
of luck and a season that they may long 
remember. 



HOCKEY SCHEDULE 


Oct. 2 


Scituate 2 


Plymouth 1 


Oct. 7 


Norwell 


Plymouth 3 


Oct. 9 


Middleboro 1 


Plymouth 1 


Oct. 22 


Bourne 1 


Plymouth 


Nov. 1 


Scituate 1 


Plymouth 1 


Nov. 5 


Marshfield 


Plymouth 


Nov. 19 


Middleboro 1 


Plymouth 1 


The game which was scheduled with 


the alumnae was cancelled because of 


snow. 








INTERMURAL BASKETBALL 
Front Row: Joan Gardner, Dorothy Morton, Helen Whiting, Nancy Reagan, Frances 

Kierstead, Martha Lemius, Margaret Brenner, Agnes Fernandes 
Second Row: Florinda Leal, Doris Bergonzini, Marcia Brooks. Anna Scotti, Mary Mul- 

cahy, Dena Rossi, Mary Goddard, and Marie Martinelli 
Third Row: Betsy McCosh, Lois Jesse, Barbara Jones, Barbara Sherman, Janice Knight, 

Eleanor Nicoli, Rose Brigida, Jean Boutin, and Janice Cavicchi 



Page 68 




NEW BASKETBALL PROGRAM 

The Plymouth High 
girls have enjoyed a 
basketball program for 
some fifteen years. 
Originally organized 
as an intra-mural pro- 
gram, a squad of 
twenty players soon 
represented the school 
in inter-scholastic 
games. Practising at Memorial Hall and 
the Armory, the girls passed through 
cycles of undefeated seasons and 
through other winters of competition 
that meant building back to more suc- 
cessful schedules. This group grew to 
the point where first and second varsity 
as well as class games were played by 
the forty girls who reported. When the 
new building became our playing field, 
a problem of ninety girls and three prac- 
tice days meant the introduction of a 
modern program. To all interested girls 
is extended the opportunity for weekly 
technique and practice games, and then 
the playing in class groups among their 
own school squads. That those of su- 




Cat : Having nine lives, I will die nine 
times. 

Frog: That's nothing. I croak every 
minute. 



perior ability should not lose the oppor- 
tunity of meeting girls of other schools, 
observing their plays and spirit, an invi- 
tation is extended to the Alumnae and 
other schools to come to the Plymouth 
gymnasium for Play Day competition. 
The day is so named to designate it as 
an effort to promote all the worthwhile 
points of competition, and this year 
girls came from Middleboro, Hing- 
ham, and Bourne. 

A team of eight players is selected 
from each class squad and an inter- 
school game afternoon finds seventy 
girls playing in both gymnasiums — 
happy at seeing the results of their own 
play improvement, but quick to ac- 
knowledge superiority in their oppon- 
ents. When undergraduate squads are 
fortunate enough to win many of their 
games, they are immediately challenged 
by the necessity of seeing to it that they 
retain their speed and skill in order to 
succeed against the same opponents the 
next year. The afternoon ends with 
school cheers and refreshments, the 
visiting team leaving with friendly 
thanks and promises to return another 
season. 





Nit: I hear that fish is a good brain 
food. 

Wit: Oh, I eat just oodles and oodles 
of fish. 

Nit: Well, there's another good 
theory shot to pieces. 

"Water attracts electricity." 
"Have you made tests to prove it?" 
"Yes, every time I'm in the bathtub 
the telephone rings." 

Teacher : If you could do it. Tommy, 
what would you invent? 

Tommy: Something that would do 
my lesson if I just pressed a button, 
ma'am. 

Teacher: You lazy boy! Now, Billy, 
you are not so lazy. What would you 
invent? 

Billy: Something to press the button, 
ma'am. 

—Boys' 



"Father," said a minister's son, "my 
teacher says the 'collect' and 'congre- 
gate' mean the same thing. Do they?" 

"Perhaps they do, my son, but you 
may tell your teacher that there is a vast 
difference between a congregation and 
a collection." 



Father : Didn't you promise me to be 
a good boy? 

Son: Yes, father. 

Father: And didn't I promise you a 
good thrashing if you weren't? 

Son: Yes, father, but, as I've broken 
my promise, you needn't keep yours. 



First Demon : Ha, ha, ha ! 

Second : Why the laugh ? 

First: I just put a woman in a room 
with a thousand beautiful hats and no 
mirror. 



First Tramp: Say, I hear old Jake 
has a job now. 

Second Tramp : Yep, it's sure a shame 
what people will do for money. 

Life 

Page 69 



CONTENTE SHOE STORE 



DR. GEORGE S. WILD 

Optometrist 
12 Main St. Plymouth 



DUNLAP OIL SERVICE 

Gulf Petroleum Service 

SERVICE STATION 



23 Sandwich St. 



Tel. Plymouth 1278 



ALPHONSO'S BODY REPAIR 



Bear Wheel Aligning 



511/2 SAMOSET STREET 
PLYMOUTH, MASS. 



Telephone 300-W 




Alphonso Chiari 



IMPRESSION/ 



We all know what is said about first 
impressions. 



College annual editors spend countless 
hours in preparation For it. 



Entrusted with the responsibility of pro- 
ducing a photofone cover for "The Pil- 
grim" we have endeavored to fulfil our 
obligation by creating something which 
will make not only a good FIRST im- 
pression but also a more lasting one. 

Wacc en p b ess 

160 WARREN STREET 

Incorporated 1 860 

BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 



Page 70 



WHITE HORSE PLAYLAND 



GEORGE KELLER, Proprietor 



M. D. COSTA 

FRUIT STORE 



THE VIOLIN SHOP 

ROGER S. KELLEN 

Dealer in Old Violins 

EXPERT REPAIRING 

9 Winslow St. Tel. 1420 Plymouth 



H. H. RAYMOND 



VERRE'S BARBER SHOP 

3 BARBERS 

Hours 8 A. M. to 8 P. M. 
52 Sandwich St. Plymouth 



PLYMOUTH BEEF CO. 



Telephone 694 



WHOLESALE BEEF, LAMB, PORK and PROVISIONS 



Off Lothrop Street 



Plymouth 



2 Texaco Service Stations 

PRIMO ZUCCHELLI 



Lincoln Street 
Phone 79 



Prince Street 
Phone 645 



PLYMOUTH 



Page 71 



Good Quality at Just Prices 

KNIFE'S 

GROCERIES — MEATS 
VEGETABLES — FRUITS 



298 Court St. 



Tel. 1286 



Plymouth 



Plymouth Rock 
Hardware Co. 



63 Main St. 



Plymouth 



Telephone 950 



CLOTHES FOR GRADUATION 



SUITS 

WHITE FLANNELS 

SHIRTS 

HOSIERY 



SPORT COATS 
SPORT SLACKS 
SWEATERS 
TIES 

MORSE & SHERMAN 



WM. J. SHARKEY 



Court Street 



Plymouth 



Bailey Motor Sales, Inc. 



Tel. 1090 



114 Sandwich Street 



Plymouth 



Buick and Pontiac Sales and Service 
G. M. C. Truck Sales and Service 

A reliable place to trade . . . One of the best equipped Service Stations 

in this vicinity . . . 24-hour service . . . Open day and night . . . 

Agents for Exide Batteries 

DON'T FORGET— All of our REPAIR WORK is GUARANTEED 

A Fine Selection of 

USED CARS AND TRUCKS 

to choose from at all times 



Page 72 



CURRIER'S 

Restaurant and Ice Cream Shop 

Local Dealer for 

Whitman and Kemp Products 

62 Court St. Plymouth 


MAROIS MARKET 
Quality Meats 

187 Court St. Tel. 1250 


CARROLL 

CUT-RATE PERFUMER 

47 Main St. Next to Fire Station 

Mr. and Mrs. M. Stern 


AMOCO SERVICE STATION 

ERNEST DUNHAM, Proprietor 


F. E. LESLIE, Druggist 

A Nice Little Drug Store 
In A Nice Little Town 


DR. E. HAROLD DONOVAN 


SILVIO LEONARDI 

PIONEER FOOD STORE 

289 Court St. Plymouth 
Telephone 53 


Official P. H. S. 
CLASS RINGS 

JEWELERS 
28 Main Street Plymouth 


WHITNEY SHIRTS MALLORY HATS 

PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

WM. CAVIGCHI, Prop. 

18 Main Street Tel. 341 

LOW OVERHEAD — REASONABLE PRICES 

Inquire About Our Special Offer on Suits for Graduation 

CONGRESS SPORTSWEAR CHARACTER CLOTHES 



Page 78 



Northeastern 
University 




College of Liberal Arts 

Offers a broad program of college subjects serving as a foundation for the un- 
derstanding of modern culture, social relations, and technical achievement. The 
purpose of this program is to give the student a liberal and cultural education and 
a vocational competence which fits him to enter some specific type of useful em- 
ployment. 

College of Business Administration 

Offers a college program with broad and thorough training in the principles of 
business with specialization in Accounting, Journalism, Banking and Finance, 
Public Administration, Industrial Administration or Marketing and Advertising. 
Instruction is through lectures, solution of business problems, class discussions, 
motion pictures and talks by business men. 

College of Engineering 

Provides complete college programs in Engineering with professional courses 
in the fields of Civil, Mechanical (with Diesel, Aeronautical, and Air Conditioning 
options), Electrical, Chemical, Industrial Engineering, and Engineering Adminis- 
tration. General engineering courses are pursued during the freshman year; thus 
the student need not make a final decision as to the branch of engineering in which 
he wishes to specialize until the beginning of the sophomore year. 

Co-operative Plan 

The Co-operative Plan, which is available to upperclassmen in all courses, pro- 
vides for a combination of practical industrial experience with classroom instruc- 
tion. Under this plan the student is able to earn a portion of his school expenses 
as well as to make business contacts which prove valuable in later years. 

Degrees Awarded 

Bachelor of Arts Bachelor of Science 

Pre-legal Programs Available 



FOR CATALOG — MAIL THIS' COUPON AT ONCE 
Northeastern University 
Director of Admissions 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Please send me a catalog of the 

r~l College of Liberal Arts [ ] Pre-Legal Program 

I I College of Business Administration 

1 I College of Engineering 

Name 

Address 

H-41 



Page 74 



SAVE 



WITH 

SAFETY 

Where you see this Emblem 




THESE MUTUAL BANKS 

Operate Your School Savings System 

PLYMOUTH SAVINGS BANK 
PLYMOUTH FIVE CENTS SAVINGS BANK 



Page 75 



O. R. SAYRE 



W. G. WOOD 



First National Stores 



4 North Street, Plymouth 



C. PAUL 

For Your 
SHOES and REPAIRING 

Honest Values Dependable Service 



53 Court St. 



Plymouth 



DUTCHLAND 

ROUTE 3 — KINGSTON 

COMPLETE LUNCHEONS and DINNERS 

AND ALWAYS 

DUTCHLAND FARMS ICE CREAM 



&tilGtrtD>& 



PLYMOUTH MOTOR SALES, Inc 



AUTHORIZED 



Mercury 



z/ord' 



Lincoln Zephyr 



ASK FOR DEMONSTRATION 



181 Court Street 



Tel. 1247-W 



Page 76 



Dutton Motor Car Co. 

115 Sandwich Street 

CADILLAC OLDSMOBILE 



Tel. 1500 



SALES 



SERVICE 



H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 

S. S. PIERCE SPECIALTIES 

Birdseye Frosted Foods 
1 Warren Ave. Tel. 1298-W 



Brockton Business College 

This school has a traditional back- 
ground of 50 years' experience in 
successful training for business 

Send for latest catalogue 

Telephone 635 

GEORGE E. BIGEiLOW, Prin. 
226 Main St. Brockton, Mass. 



Helen's Beauty Shop 

BEAUTY CULTURE 

In AH Its Branches 

19 Court Street 
Tel. 213-M 



Relief for ACID STOMACH 
BISMA-REX 

Four Action Antacid Powder 

Neutralizes Acidity — Removes Gas — 

Soothes Stomach — Assists Digestion 

Big Bottle 50c 

Save with Safety at 

COOPER DRUG COMPANY 
BEMIS DRUG COMPANY 

"The 6 Busy REXALL Stores" 
Abington — N. Abington — Rockland 

"In Plymouth it's Cooper's" 



PETROLEUM SALES and SERVICE, Inc. 

Agents for 

THE ATLANTIC REFINING CO. 

Filtered Range and Fuel Oils White Flash Gasoline 

Atlantic High Film Strength Motor Oils 



HEDGE ROAD 



PLYMOUTH 



Telephone, Plymouth 1499 



Page 77 



IT HAS BEEN OUR GREAT PLEASURE TO SERVE 
BOTH THE HIGH AND JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOLS 
DURING THE SCHOOL YEARS FROM 1940 to 1941 



LAHEY ICE CREAM CO. 



10 Nelson Street, Plymouth Tel. 160 



Good Printing Increases Sales! 

* Tell your friends and customers all about your 
products with ROGERS' better-than-usual printing. 
You can increase your profits with properly pre- 
pared folders, catalogs, leaflets and direct mail 
pieces — and even invoices and statements can be 
given advertising value 

* Telephone us today, and one of our representa- 
tives will gladly call, at no obligation, to tell you 
how economically we can produce profitable print- 
ing for you 

Plymouth 165-M 

Une S\og,erA Print 

20 Middle Street Plymouth 

Page 78 



PLYMOUTH ROCK ALLEYS 



OPEN SUNDAYS 
OPEN DAILY 

Opposite Railroad Station 



1 P. M. — 12 P. M. 
10 A. M. — 12 P. M. 



Tel. Plymouth 855 



BANDER'S 



PLYMOUTH'S MOST 
POPULAR 

SHOP FOR MISSES 

AND WOMEN 

54 Main Street Tel. 38 Plymouth 



Priscilla Maid Weavers 

Congratulations to the 
SENIOR CLASS 

frtBrtlla ifflatu 

Hand Weavers 

THE TIE SHOP 

PLYMOUTH 



CAPE FUEL MART 

PLYMOUTH 

To Buy Your Winter's Fuel Supply 

Ask About Our 
NEW FUEL BUDGET PLAN 



NEW ENGLAND COKE 



NEW RIVER 
BITUMINOUS 



FIREPLACE WOOD 



KINDLING 



RANGE & 
FUEL OIL 



DISTRIBUTORS FOR 

FAMOUS READING ANTHRACITE 

THE LOW ASH HARD COAL 

LAUNDERED AND TRADE-MARKED 

FOR YOUR PROTECTION 



Page 79 



If it's new 
you'll find it at 



GRANT'S 

the value spot in Plymouth 



TOWN BROOK 


PLYMOUTH & BROCKTON 


SERVICE STATION 


STREET RAILWAY CO. 


LUBRICATION 


Ride Our Modern 


Repairing — 24 Hour Service 


AIR-CONDITIONED BUSES 


Tel. 820-W 


Sandwich St. Plymouth 


D. E. REID 




Wholesale Confectionery 


BELL SHOP 


Candy is a Delicious Food 
Eat some every day 


Hosiery, Underwear, Corsetry 


Paper Specialties 


12 Court St. Plymouth 


Tel. 1081-M 5 Willard Place 





BEST WISHES 



SHERMANS 



PLYMOUTH 



NO. PLYMOUTH 



Page 80 



PLYMOUTH LUMBER CO. 

Plymouth 

BUILDING MATERIALS OF ALL KINDS 

Tel. 237 



EDDIE'S SHOE SYSTEM 

18 Main Street 
Enna-Jettick Shoe Store 

EDDIE HAND, Manager 


CLOUGH'S 

The Complete Food Market 

84 Summer St. Tel. 459 


Gambini's 

Air Conditioned 
LUNCHEONETTE 


W. R. Davis H. S. Hatch 

Davis 8C Morgan Electric Co. 

ELECTRICAL PROBLEMS 

HONESTLY SOLVED 

DEPENDABLE WIRING 

Plymouth Since 1919 Tel. 290 



PIAZZL/yfe Florist 



Choicest Cut Flowers and Potted Plants 
Funeral and Wedding Work a Specialty 

Expert Floral Designs We Grow Our Own Flowers 



PHONE 1518 



4 CORDAGE TERRACE EXT. 



Page 81 



We extend to you of the Graduating Class of Plymouth 
High School sincere congratulations on the completion of 
your school course and express best wishes for your future. 

At this time allow us to thank you for your loyalty to us. We 
trust we may merit your continued patronage. 



BUTTNER'S 



OF PLYMOUTH 



Beauty Culture 

A VOCATION OF DIGNITY 

Offers young men and women a life of Refinement, 
Security and Prosperity . . . 

WRITE TODAY 

Our entire building is devoted to Day and Evening Classes 
conducted by Renowned Style Creators. Complete system- 
atized courses. Most modern equipment. 

MODERATE TUITION 
CONVENIENT TERMS 

Wilfred Graduates are in daily demand 

FREE PLACEMENT BUREAU 

For further information or for free booklet write 
or visit our Academy without obligation. 

WILFRED ACADEMY 

of Hair and Beauty Culture 
492 Boylston St. Boston KENmore 0880 




Page 82 



Castle Motors 

DESOTO — PLYMOUTH 

AUTHORIZED SALES & SERVICE 
120 Sandwich Street Plymouth 



PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 

PLUMBING, HEATING 
PAINT, and HARDWARE SUPPLIES 

39 Court Street Tel. 1423 



KELLER'S HOME BAKERY 

300 Court St. No. Plymouth 

Tel. Plymouth 609 
The Quality Pastry Shoppe 



Phone 406 

Hours: 9:15 to 11:30 — 1:15 to 5:00 

and By Appointment 

DR. FRANK L. BAILEY 

OPTOMETRIST 

Russell Bldg. Plymouth 



COUNTY AUTO SUPPLY 

A. A. LUPIEN, Proprietor 



S ADO HI'S 



fosbion vomer 



Shows the NEWEST in Misses and 
Women's Wear at Moderate Prices 



BORZAN BEAUTY SALON 

MISS EVA BORSARI 
391 Court Street North Plymouth 

Tel. 615 



Page 83 



JOSEPH J. WOOD 

Successor to Anthony Atwood 

DEALER IN 

FRESH SALTED and 

PICKLED FISH 

Scallops, Lobsters, Oysters, and Clams 
Telephone 261—262 



GINO'S SERVICE STATION 



34 Samoset St. 



Tel. 1375-W-R 



When there is better work done, 
we will do it. 

GOVI'S TAILOR SHOP 

FRED L. VACCHINO, Mgr. 

Telephone 662 

Main Street Plymouth 



KAY'S CUT-RATE 

67 Main Street 
Corner North 

PATENT MEDICINES, 
COSMETICS 

Lowest Prices in Town 



Telephone 1187-W 

JIM'S RESTAURANT & GRILL 

Regular Dinners — A La Carte Service 

Shore Dinners Our Specialty 

5 and 7 Main St. Plymouth 

ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 

BEAUTY SHOP 
Room 10 Buttner Building 

PLYMOUTH 



FOR THE GRADUATION GIFT 
Give a fine Watch or Ring 

We carry a complete line of Nationally Advertised Watches: 
Bulova, Benrus, Elgin, Gruen, Hamilton, Waltham, and Longines. 

Friendship and Birthstone Rings, Pen and Pencil sets, 

Umbrellas, Overnight Cases, Tie and Collar Sets, Bill Folds, 

Lockets, Crosses, Bracelets, Rosaries, Toilet Sets 

PAY AS LITTLE AS FIFTY CENTS A WEEK 



jrnt; 




EWELRYX /COMPANY 

15 Main St., Tel. Plymouth 65 



Visit Our 

OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

Prescriptions Filled — Glasses Fitted 

Broken Lenses Replaced 



Page 8J, 



JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Your Hardware Store for 116 Years 

PAINTS, HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCES, 

PLUMBING, HEATING, SHEET METAL WORK 

1 Main Street, Plymouth 

Tel. 283 



"Plymouth's Modern Store for Men and Boys." 

WE FEATURE 

ADAM HATS, FLORSHEIM SHOES, CLIPPER CRAFT CLOTHES, 

ARROW SHIRTS, INTERWOVEN HOSE 

PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 

"Home of Dependability" 

Plymouth 



56 Main Street 



BURDETT 
COLLEGE 




m 



em THE TRAII 



NEEDS OF THE TIME 



IG MEETS THE 



or 



One- and two-year courses. Well- 
qualified faculty. Extra-curricula 
activities. Day and Evening classes. 
Previous commercial training not re- 
quired. Courses meet the needs of 
business and government. Calls 
for graduates exceed the supply. 
Catalogue contains full information. 



BUSINESS TRAINING SINCE 1879 

BURDETT COLLEGE 

Telephone HANiock 6300 



::».'*l,.5 6 S T U ART S T.'.fCf EJT^rB OS'tO^N 



the immediate demand 

tor tke future opportunity 




Page 85 



CAPPANNARI BROS. 



Sibley's Shoe Store 




Exclusive Agents in Plymouth for 


BEN R. RESNICK COMPANY 


AIR-STEP Shoes for Women 




ROBLEE Shoes for Men 


Cor. Summer and High Street 


BUSTER BROWN Shoes for Boys and Girls 




"If it's new, it's at Sibley's 


Tel. 698 


11 Court St. 





Join us at 

HOWARD JOHNSONS 



Plymouth Shop 



(OPEN EVENINGS) 



Mitchell-Thomas Co., Inc. 



FURNITURE — WALLPAPER — PAINTS 



66 Court Street 



Plymouth 



Page 86 



Nook Farm Dairy 




and Cream 



HEALTH 
BUILDER 



-•*(►-- 



. . . Local Milk . . . 

Taste the difference from a modern dairy 



TRY OUR FLAVORED DRINKS 

CHOCOLATE • ORANGE • COFFEE 
NOOK ROAD TEL. 1261 PLYMOUTH 



Page 87 



DR. S. S. HIRSON 



MAYFLOWER CLEANSERS 

KOBLANTZ BROS. 

First Class Tailoring 

Call for and Deliver Service 
Emond Bldg. Phone 1240 Plymouth 



VOLTA OIL CO. 
Texaco 8C Firestone Distributor 

FULL LINE OF VICTOR, BLUE BIRD 
and DECCA RECORDS 

297 Court St. No. Plymouth 

Tel. 840-W 



FORN SIGN COMPANY 



EARL W. GOODING 

Jeweler Optometrist 



24 Main St. 



Plymouth 



CONVENIENT, ECONOMICAL 
LAUNDRY SERVICE 

(®lb (ttnlnng ICamtftnj 



Tel. 272 



Howland St. 



Before You Buy Any Refrigerator 
Be sure you look at our 1941 Air Conditioned 

ICE REFRIGERATOR 

With Ice You Get All 5 Advantages 

ECONOMY — PROPER MOISTURE — CONSTANT COLD 

CLEANED-W ASHED AIR — ICE CUBES 

Remember — Cold alone is not enough 

CAPE REFRIGERATING CO. 



PLANT AT 

Hedge Road 

Plymouth 




SALES OFFICE 

44 Court St. 

Plymouth 



Page 88 



BALBONFS DRUG STORE 

"The Drug Store That Serves Plymouth" 

U. S. POSTAL STATION No. 2 
"PRESCRIPTIONS ACCURATELY FILLED — FREE DELIVERY" 

JOSEPH BALBONI, Registered Pharmacist 

Telephone 1231 — 1057 317 Court Street 

FOR NIGHT SERVICE CALL 432-W 



WALK-OVER SHOE STORE 

65 Main St. Plymouth 

/ Walk-Over Shoes 
\ Bass Moccasins 
/ Kamp Tramps 



Agents for 



) Goodrich Line of 

/ Sneakers and Rubbers 

\ Arnold & Stetson Shoes 



D. W. BESSE, Proprietor 



Edes Manufacturing Co. 



STEVENS the Florist 

3Unro?ra far All ©rraatntta 

Member of The Florist Telegraph Delivery Association 

9 COURT STREET 



CECCARELLI 

CUSTOM TAILORS 

Cleansers — Furriers 



New Cleansing Plant on Premises — 3 Hour Service 

WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER 
301 Court Street Tel. 941 North Plymouth 



Page 89 



IOIOYAI & SULLIffl 

mmum company 



PHOTO-ENGRAVERS 



470 fliunmc avoi 



Harbor Building 



Lib. 8711 



Represented by 



P. V. 



i ■ «'""■»""■) 



Page 90 



Plymouth Co-operative Federal 

Savings and Loan Association 



Incorporated 1882 

A. PERRY RICHARDS 
President 



Federalized 1937 



ROBERT T. TUBBS 

Vice-Pres. and Treasurer 



WALDER J. ENGSTROM 
Secretary and Asst. Treas. 



Sl¥f t&ddf and you need 
not wa rry about tanwvuw 



You can predict your 
own financial future 
when you provide for it. 

Each month a portion 
of your earnings should 
be set aside for that 
future time when your 
earning power has 
waned. 

You get 
LIBERAL GARninGS 

mSURGD SAFETY 





Call or Write for Information 

Plymouth Co-operative 
Federal Savings 






AND LOAN ASSOCIATION 

forty/our Main St, 
Plymouth, Massachusetts. 



Page 91 



LEO'S 
BARBER and BEAUTY SHOPS 

PLYMOUTH and DUXBURY 



DR. A. L. DOUGLAS 



"We put new life in old shoes" 
PLYMOUTH SHOE HOSPITAL 

63«/2 Main Street Plymouth 

ZANELLO FURNITURE CO. 

UPHOLSTERING — BEDDING 

NORGE, GIBSON, & CROSLEY 

REFRIGERATORS 

84 Court Street Tel. 1485 




ft* 




■ 



PUZZLED 

by Gift 

Problems ? 

Take a Tip . . . Take a Trip to 

K'S, Inc. 



19 — 21 Court Street 



"The Nation's Birthplace" 



Plymouth 













%.,;^'^^^^^®^q^^ 



"-".sSs^kSS^* 



Pa#e ,92 



Plymouth Agents for 


DUPONT'S PAINTS NORGE PRODUCTS 


REFRIGERATORS and WASHING MACHINES 


WESTINGHOUSE AIR CONDITIONING HOME HEATERS 


BLISS HARDWARE CO., Inc. 


Opposite Old Colony Theatre Tel. 825 


PLYMOUTH 




House w £ Blue Blinds 


DUNLOP TIRE COMPANY 


7 North St., Plymouth 




Tel. 1149 


28 Sandwich St. Tel. 1115 


Breakfast — Dinner — Supper 




Home-Cooked Bread, Cake and Pastry 




JOHN, and CONSTANCE KENNY 


PEPSI-COLA 




Hits the Spot 


Your Best Friends 


WEATHER IT'S COLD 


will tell you they have 


or 


their clothes reconditioned at 


WEATHER IT'S HOT! 


SOUTH SHORES FINEST 


Drink 


Cleaners — Tailors — Furriers 


PEPSI - COLA 


Tailoring Dept. 


PLYMOUTH 


PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 


BOTTLING WORKS, Inc. 


56 Main Street Plymouth 


124 Sandwich St. Phone 1623-W 





Page 93 



In 


the 


Long Run . . . 








you and your friends will prize the portrait that looks 






like you — your truest self, free : 


rom stage effects and 






little conceits. 








It is in this "long run" photog 


;raphy that PURDY 






success has been won. 








Portraiture by the camera that one cannot laugh at or 






cry over in later years. 








For present pleasure and future pride protect your 






photographic self by having 


PURDY make the 






portraits. 








PURDY 




160 TREMONT STREET 


BOSTON 




Official Photographers to Plymouth High Schoc 


►I Class 1941 






Special rates to P. H. S Students 





Page 94 



Autographs 

<ttla00 nf 1941 



Class Colors — 
Powder Blue and Ruby 



Class Motto — 
By Faith and Fortitude 



Page 95 



AutograpIjH 

(UlasH of 1941 



Class Colors — 
Powder Blue and Ruby 



Class Motto — 
By Faith and Fortitude 



Page 96 






*-"~-*V • 






icuttf^ 



•i^CU 






J::i:;:: 














: :::::K;::::J: